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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ok now my last removal was a nest just hanging on the side of the house and today I just picked up 2 more like it, crackerbee and I are now trading removals depending on who is closer and he just gave me 1 that sounds like its the same, I am wondering if the migrant hives that have flooded florida atm are just releasing swarms like mad and absconding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for the idea Perry, you the man!! :yahoo:
 

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First off, what does it say between "rumor" and "rest"? Because of the color contrast between the background and the teal printed words I can't read them.

Absconding in European Honeybees, a term I use to denote most managed bees in migratory hives, is rare. So, I don't see that being the source cause.

Also, I would be surprised if migratory beekeepers have hives swarming at this time of year in FL. I would imagine that they would be working their bees to ready them for honey production or for going off to CA for almond pollination. Swarming colonies don't pollinate well and don't produce the honey crop that a nonswarming colony does. So, to a commercial beekeeper, a swarming colony is lost production.
 

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sqkcrk said:
First off, what does it say between "rumor" and "rest"? Because of the color contrast between the background and the teal printed words I can't read them.

.
Winters 2 weeks (sic)
 

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sqkcrk, i don't remember hearing if the almonds produce a good honey crop or not. I remember reading that the almond growers keep their ground mowed because the bees prefer work other things if available? Thanks in advance, Jack
 

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The hives I have worked in SC which had come from the almond groves of CA were heavy w/ honey. They weren't supered for honey to be extracted though. They were two deeps tall.

I don't know if anyone extracts almond honey anyway. It tastes terrible. But, I bet someone does. Whatever it takes to fill the barrel is quite often the attitude.

It may be that almond growers mow so an alternative bloom is less available to the pollinating bees. I wouldn't be surprised. I don't know if the almond blossom is more attractive to the bees than whatever is growing on the ground. Were I paying for pollination I would want the bees to concentrate on the trees and not the dandelions or whatever. Apple orchards often mow while, or just before, the bees are in the apple orchards.
 
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