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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone grown M. cambrica? I haven't been able to find anyone on net who recomends as bee plan other than people who sell it. but I'm always optimistic, someone, against all thus far evidence will pipe up and say oh yes, the bees are crazy for it..
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
no idea what it is. I think I might be on the wrong continent
well, I guess that answers the question. It's called the welsh poppy, comes form cold damp places western Europe, Uk etc. Likes it cold so not too well known in most of Australia either. Yellow mostly. Disappointing, I wanted the cheery yellows, as well as a bee plant in my planting design, but don't get enough summer heat here for californians poppies. I suspect you'd grow the californian poppy.
 

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well, I guess that answers the question. It's called the welsh poppy, comes form cold damp places western Europe, Uk etc. Likes it cold so not too well known in most of Australia either. Yellow mostly. Disappointing, I wanted the cheery yellows, as well as a bee plant in my planting design, but don't get enough summer heat here for californians poppies. I suspect you'd grow the californian poppy.
can you grow golden rod in your area? this stuff expands on its own fast, it sends out runners and new plants pop up, its yellow flowered and bees LOVE it...in late summer/early fall I have a sea of yellow in my pasture and the smell is fantastic...the honey smells like the golden rod, so when you go out in the fields it smells like the honey..as the honey takes up the smell of whatever flowers its made of..

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
can you grow golden rod in your area? this stuff expands on its own fast, it sends out runners and new plants pop up, its yellow flowered and bees LOVE it...in late summer/early fall I have a sea of yellow in my pasture and the smell is fantastic...the honey smells like the golden rod, so when you go out in the fields it smells like the honey..as the honey takes up the smell of whatever flowers its made of..

Yes, i hear so much about goldenrod and it's late summer value for bees. Solidago sphecelata .. the waspy goldenrod (sphecid= wasp- new latin). I have been considering goldenrod lately. We don't often get summers that go beyond mild t shirt weather, unlike most of Australia, summers are coolish here. So if goldenrod needs heat for growth or sugar production, it prob might not thrive, which would be reflected in forage quality. Helenium autumnale if it is comparable, puts on a good show here though. Maybe S.rugosa . Soil here usually wet, heavy but well structured, slightly acid clay. Don't want anything with weed potential.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
sounds like you have the same soils there as I do upstate, mostly rocky and clay, thats why I try and get as much organic material into the soil..
yeah, good work on getting organic matter into soil- very few soils can't be improved with increased OM. Does your have good mineral profile? I'm quite jealous of north american soils. Australia- old, old old soils. Whenever we have mulch - and we try to cover all bare ground with hardwood mulch or living stuff- if the chooks haven't scratched all the mulch off, our red clay soils are a beautiful black from humus- in 6 months its black 5 cm down, and 2 years 10 cm down into soil profile. Its a beautiful thing.( sob sob) We're on sedimentary soil, so minerals largely washed out over eons (no glacial activity here last ice age) and not a rock, pebble or one grain of sand if we don't bring it in. I used crushed basalt by the uteful here, and it makes good chook grit too. I never bring in minerally "empty' stone or grit, only small shell grit, any rock dust I can get, and the above mentioned basalt crusher dust. I'm big on cut n drop green manures too- the lazy gardeners method of adding OM.
 

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yeah, good work on getting organic matter into soil- very few soils can't be improved with increased OM. Does your have good mineral profile? I'm quite jealous of north american soils. Australia- old, old old soils. Whenever we have mulch - and we try to cover all bare ground with hardwood mulch or living stuff- if the chooks haven't scratched all the mulch off, our red clay soils are a beautiful black from humus- in 6 months its black 5 cm down, and 2 years 10 cm down into soil profile. Its a beautiful thing.( sob sob) We're on sedimentary soil, so minerals largely washed out over eons (no glacial activity here last ice age) and not a rock, pebble or one grain of sand if we don't bring it in. I used crushed basalt by the uteful here, and it makes good chook grit too. I never bring in minerally "empty' stone or grit, only small shell grit, any rock dust I can get, and the above mentioned basalt crusher dust. I'm big on cut n drop green manures too- the lazy gardeners method of adding OM.
where I am the soils are acidic, so lime is key to growing good anything..also alot of hardpan clay under the first 5 to 10 inches of soil, but this is a good thing as it holds the water, I havent watered my garden upstate at all other than the initial seed or plant planting, and we had a dry summer..and everything grew great, down in the vallies where they have much deeper soil and less clay, the ground doesnt hold the water and you need artificial watering..
this year I bought an old manure spreader and im rebuilding it, im about 80% done and next year ill use it to spread both manure and lime mix on the food plot fields...
oh and plenty of rocks from the size of your fist to boulders....I have dug what I thought was a small rock sticking up in the field and have it ending up weighing in at a ton or so...good thing for heavy equipment..and then im bringing in dirt to fill the hole in, the frost cycles push the rocks up, so even though I plow and pull up rocks the next year or so more rocks get plowed up...
 
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