Melons

Discussion in 'General Gardening' started by Hobie, Feb 18, 2011.

  1. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Okay, I learned about "determinate" and "indeterminate" tomatoes here.

    Now, can anyone tell me what a "full slip," "3/4 slip" or "non-slip" melon is?
     
  2. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Do you mean when carrying them out of the field. :lol: Jack
     

  3. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    OK, let’s give this a shot.

    From what I understand, “slip†is a measurement of a melon’s ripeness. “Full†slip means the stem will easily “slip†off the melon, 3/4 slip…not as easy, etc. This applies to musk melons and probably others.

    The stems on a honeydew and watermelons will never “slip†off the melons, so those are “non-slipâ€.

    That’s my story and I’m sticking to it! :eek:ldtimer:

    Walt
     
  4. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    wow, thanks WaltB! I would never have guessed that one.... I tend to over complicate things a lot of the time :oops:
     
  5. Murrell

    Murrell New Member

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    A watermelon has to be thumped to determine how ripe it is.

    Or picked up and dropped, then grab the heart and run !

    Not me Grandpaw !!

    Murrell
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    hope you don't mind this little story Hobie...

    My father was raised in the very small town of Robertsburg, West Virginia which at the time my father was a young man was just thick with young men. Just across 18 mile creek (on the south side of Robertsburg) lived Doctor Summers who was a medical doctor but he also raised lots of watermelons on his river side farm. Up the river a piece (hillbillies talk like that) was an old farmer by the name of Jason Board who raised a lot of stuff but come melon season posted guards around his place in the hopes of limiting theft. Jason Board ran into Dr Summers at the General Store (at that time the largest in the world) in Buffalo, West Virginia and asked him how he kept all those 'boys' over in Robertsburg from stealing him blind when the watermelons became ripe. Dr Young supposedly answer him with the reply.... 'I wouldn't give a plug nickel for a boy that wouldn't steal a watermelon'.
     
  7. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Hobie, us'un down here call a plant slip a new sprouted plant(that has runners) a slip (like a sweetpotatoe slip) i would think a melon would be called the same, with the size of the runner being the length.With a max. length of six to eight inches for planting.I.ve never heard that term on melons. If their talking ripeness of a melon then Walt B's got it right.That's my thinking anyway. Jack
     
  8. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Thanks for the info, everyone! I've never had much luck with melons, but I like them so I keep trying!