Mice killed my hive.

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Kevin1969, Feb 4, 2019.

  1. Kevin1969

    Kevin1969 New Member

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    After a week of below zero actual Temps and howling winds, the weather broke and was able to do my first winter inspection. It's a balmy 57 degrees here in western NY in February .

    I was expecting my hives to be blown over, but both were still standing . And bees flying everywhere from one,..but the other showed no signs of life.

    After cracking it open the smell of urine and wet bedding hit me. Not a single bee was left. I sealed the entrance ( so I thought) from mice. This is my first year beekeeping, and lesson ed learned.

    Question...can I let my other hive clean off the frames in spring before I disinfect them, or is that not recommended due to any contamination from the mice?
     
  2. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

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    I wouldnt , unkown what disease the mice brought that killed off the bees...do you have any amount of dead bees in the hive? if so send them out to usda in beltsville for a free inspection on what really killed them..
     

  3. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    if the hive were healthy the mouse would have been wrapped in propolis. you might send some bees off for testing.
     
  4. Kevin1969

    Kevin1969 New Member

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    It was a family of mice,..at least 4,...all alive when I opened it up. Most if the honeycomb was gone. Just a small amount of fondent left. This was the stronger of me 2 hives. Rookie mistake not sealing entrance better.
     
  5. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I am sorry for the loss of your hive. Those mice must have snuck in when the bees were in cluster.