might have a mouse

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by pistolpete, Nov 24, 2012.

  1. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I was quite tardy about putting on the mouse guard, figuring that with my hive entrance nearly two feet off the ground it was no big deal. When I checked the sticky board today there were two "turds" on there. They were black and a bit smaller than a rice grain. Did not really look like mouse poop, but possibly could be. So my question is: is there anything else that could account for that. With a mouse I would expect lots of droppings and they normally look bigger. If it turns out to be a mouse, should I open the hive and get it out, or do something along the lines of poison?
     
  2. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    I know mice can get into small spaces, but I doubt it could get up into the frames/comb. Is it possible to remove the entrance reducer (if you have one) and feel around with a clothes hanger?
     

  3. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood Member

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    Like Slowmodem said, I would take a metal rod or yard stick and sweep around to see if you scare anything out. A mouse can do a lot of damage. The bees will be clustered and not be able to run it out. I would be skeptical of poison. I just wouldn't want any poison in or around my food source. If it dies in the hive...ick!
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    If it's warm enough that your bees are moving around in the hive, they will take care of the mouse. If it dies in there they will eventually encapsulate it with propolis.
     
  5. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    I've heard of Mighty Mouse, but I guess that would be mummy mouse? :dontknow:
     
  6. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    with the entrance so high, I can shine a light in under the bottom frames. I don't see anything. That's why I was wondering if there is anything else in the hive that might result in a few black bits under the bottom board. I'm not keen on breaking the propolis seals in the hive. Average daytime high is 0 celsius.
     
  7. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Mice will go up in between the frames and eat the pollen and honey. There are 2 different ways mice invade a hive 1, enter for a meal and goes back to its nest is what you may have happening. The second is the mouse thinks the hive is a warm inviting place to live with a ready stocked food supply and moves in and builds a nest. It is to cold to go thru the hive and break the cluster.Use a wire with the end bent upwards 3" and run it between the 3 or four outside frames and see if any mouse nest debree comes down. Use caution and listen to the bees for signs to let you know the end of wire is into the cluster. Put the mice bate poison under the hive and in small areas. to go coffee cups work well for putting poison in put the lid on with a hole in the lid for a mouse to enter and place on their side. you can place them under shrubs, trees, in the bottom of the wood pile. You could also remove the hive cover and inner cover and look down with a flashlight, if you do this observe how far the cluster is down to give you an indication of how much stores the bees have left.
     
  8. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    pete,
    mice can climb up 2 ft. 2 turds, hmmm....was there any other debris on the sticky board? wax crumbs? or bits of something that mice would haul in to nest with? or on the landing board? anyway, maybe the little bugger went in to check it out and the bees chased it off. if it was nesting in there, i would expect to see debris from wax or nesting material they drug in the hive to make themselves at home, and more than 2 turds.

    as perry said, the bees will sting and propolize the mouse, if a mouse takes residence. this will happen before the bees cluster, or during the winter when days are warmer, that the cluster breaks.

    as apis said, mice will eat the pollen and honey, but you will see evidence of the debris on the bottom of the hive, or bottom board, as i mentioned, as well as evidence of nesting material.

    sweep the bottom of the hive as others have mentioned, and as apis described, also,as you said about breaking the hive open, i would not disturb the cluster or break the seals on a hive either to look for a mouse. at some point if you have a resident mouse, the bees will take care of it.

    just saying, 2 turds are nothing, mice are dirty, messy critters, and they leave more than that behind when taking up residence.

    as far as poison......, all the mice bait, they can drag off, chew off and store it where you don't want it and then die where you don't want them to die.....i have learned the hard way after having mice bait stored in various engine parts of 4 wheel vehicles and sleds....

    best fall and winter mouse getter, antifreeze in a 5 gallon pail. don't have to fill it, but put a stick or dowel in the bucket. the mice are attracted to it, like water. they climb up the side of the bucket and down the stick or dowel and fall in........
     
  9. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    No, there was nothing else on the sticky board. Just the normal bee stuff, chewed cappings and some mites. Also the hive is clean on the inside above the screen. Best as I can tell there is no mouse nest. Initially I thought it could be moth pupa of some sort.
     
  10. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    i don't know about the moth pupae, sounded more like the darn mice looking for a nice warm food kitchen to get into, then decided against it. best way you can tell a mice is nesting in there is the debris they leave behind making the darn nest, and the turds they leave behind, well that is, if they don't chew an obvious hole through a wooden entrance reducer.....and also sweeping the bottom of the hive, nesting material drops down along with the chewed cappings. good luck to ya and overwintering that hive!
     
  11. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    use Anti freeze with caution all animals are attracted to it but it causes liver failiour and a slow and painful death if your pet drinks it there is nothing the vet can do except put your pet to death.
     
  12. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Well you could set out some traps, but lets just hope it is not one of those tough rats!! :lol::lol:

    Watch it to the end, pretty funny.

    [video=youtube;cOVgMOsjxxM]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&v=cOVgMOsjxxM&NR=1[/video]
     
  13. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    apis~
    "use Anti freeze with caution all animals are attracted to it but it causes liver failiour and a slow and painful death if your pet drinks it there is nothing the vet can do except put your pet to death. "

    this is true apis, common sense, i don't use this where the critters and pets can get to it......my beehives are enclosed in massive bear fencing , not much get's in except the mice and rats, works well in outbuildings in freezing temps.
     
  14. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    moth and moth pupa droppings do look similar to SMALL mouse droppings, but they are smaller.
     
  15. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Gypsi we don't have the greater wax moth but get infected with the codling moth which goes after the pollen more than the wax. The cold temps up here has taken care of them months ago.
    G3 Nice video.