missing brood

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by lodison99, Apr 8, 2012.

  1. lodison99

    lodison99 New Member

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    Two weeks ago I did an inspection on my hives and found that two of them had no brood whatsoever in them. The queens are still in the hive and the bees are still collecting pollen. Found a couple SHB in them and have taken steps to eliminate them. Is this a symptom of SHB or do I have a larger problem on my hands?
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Not a symptom of SHB.

    Did your hives swarm by chance?

    This could be a virgin or newly mated queen that has not started laying yet.

    Give her a week or so and see what happens.
     

  3. lodison99

    lodison99 New Member

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    For one of them that is a possibility. Was out of town for two weeks and the population has decreased and I found a lone queen cell.

    The other is a new hive from a colony I split.
     
  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    The lone queen cell you found what shape was it in.......uncapped, capped, side cut out, bottom opened, torn down? Kind of odd for a swarm to make just one queen cell.

    On the split, is the other half of the split doing OK, got brood? How long was it that you made the split, any evidence they made a queen cell? If not might give them another frame of brood with eggs to start another queen cell.
     
  5. lodison99

    lodison99 New Member

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    The lone queen cell was whole, but the bottom was breached as though she had recently emerged. Giving it a week and seeing what comes of it.

    I did the split in early march when I found queen cells in the hive. Both were producing brood. The initial still is. I'll add more brood from the initial colony if the split still is broodless.
     
  6. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Personally, I would give it two weeks to let her have a chance at getting going. But I'd give the hive a frame with eggs in anyway as a sort of insurance against any laying worker getting started...if they are truly queenless. :wink:
     
  7. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    After the queen emerges from the cell it can take two to three week for her to start laying. Remember she has to sexually mature, go on her mating flight and then even settle before she can start laying.