Mite question

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by hlhart2001, Oct 21, 2012.

  1. hlhart2001

    hlhart2001 New Member

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    Okay, perhaps this may be a simpleton's question but, I want to know when I find mites on the sticky board...what causes them to end up there(if you don't use any treatments). Is it because the bees have groomed and they fall off, the mites simply die and fall down or what? Thanks, Halley
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    It's called natural drop. Some from grooming, some from weak mites losing their foothold.
     

  3. hlhart2001

    hlhart2001 New Member

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    Well that was easy..thanks for the answer.
     
  4. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    There are formulas for figuring the mite population in your hive based on the natural mite drop over 24 hr's I can't remember what it is as I have never counted mites myself. some one else may know and post it.
    Thanks
     
  5. Omie

    Omie Active Member

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    I would think that would vary a lot based on any one of many factors, thus not be too reliable. For example, on a cool day the bees might not be as active and might not be grooming much. On a warm rainy day all the foragers would stay home and there'd be more mites dropping inside the hive. Less mites right after a swarm..... etc etc.
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    as far as I can tell (from what I have read) almost any mite counting regime is subject to a large error terms. I think Apis and Omie have pointed out several variables in the calculation and the list is likely to just go on and on. I have never used sticky boards myself but I would think you could on a moderately warm and sunny day add anything that would encourage grooming behavior and get some bench mark number on mite population. I have read reports from Europe that they used a small quantity of rough cut tobacco tossed in a hot smoker and two or three puff in the front door generated the proper response.
     
  7. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Here is information on Natural mite drop and the infestation rates. It is suggested in other article to leave the boards in for 3 days and divide the results by 3 to get a more accurate average.

    24-Hour Prorated Natural Drop Test for the Varroa Mite:
    Calculating the prorated 24-hour natural drop on a full size sticky board collected
    over a 3-5 day period provides the best indication of mite infestation levels.
    · The strength of the hive is important to obtain a reasonable indication of
    infestation. All data in our literature is for hives of approximately 30,000 bees, 10
    frames of bees and 3-5 frames of brood in two deep boxes. In the early spring and
    late summer your hives will probably be this strength.
    · Always count the entire board. Prorating and counting half the board is a big
    mistake.
    · Count only mature female mites. Concentrate on the size and shape. Be aware
    that mites can be of any shade of brown from light to dark to fully black and
    reportedly half black and half white.
    · Do not count mites of smaller size, white, pearly white, or yellow. These mites
    are either males or immature mites, which cannot cause future damage.

    THE NATURAL DROP: Tells you how high your infestation levels are and what kind of
    treatment is required. In the case of formic acid and the MiteGone method these are
    general recommendations:
    Natural Drop/24hrs Infestation Levels
    0-8 Low
    8-15 Moderate
    15-30 High
    30+ Critical
    The natural drop will also tell you how well your fall treatment worked in the spring and
    vice versa. If your natural drop is below 8 – 10 mites, then congratulations, you are
    doing well!

    Recommendation are to treat if the count is above 10
     
  8. Omie

    Omie Active Member

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    Would you please identify the source of your information, ApisBees.
     
  9. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    This is one source.
    http://www.mitegone.com/pdfpages/Methods of Testing.pdf

    At the last beekeepers meeting in Salmon Arm the Provincial Apiary inspector talked about mite treatments and the different methods of determining mite loads and whether to treat or not. He uses the either roll if inspecting some ones hive and wants to know the mite load while there. On this own hives he uses the natural drop method. He doesn't have screened bottom boards so he places the #8 mesh on his sticky board made from corplas election signs and slides them in on the bottom board.
     
  10. Omie

    Omie Active Member

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    The information you posted appears to be from this Canadian website:
    http://www.honeybeeworld.com/diary/incl/bj10.htm

    No problem, but I just like to know who actually wrote what when it comes to posting information quoted from other sources. :)