Mite treatment

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Snowtop, Sep 25, 2017.

  1. Snowtop

    Snowtop New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    I live in Southern Maine area. My one hive consist of 2 deep 10 frames and one medium 10 frame honey super. Yesterday I took off the honey super and put in basement so I could treat with Api Life Var. I just noticed I have brood in there. Should I be concerned they will hatch? There are aprox 3 frames like that. the rest have capped honey. I don't plan on harvesting until Spring seeing this is my first year as a beekeeper. I'm a little confused as what to do at this point.
     
  2. Snowtop

    Snowtop New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    All set here. I got my answer.
     

  3. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

    Messages:
    556
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    28
    welcome aboard, have you looked into oxilic acid vapor for mite treatment?
     
  4. ccjersey

    ccjersey Member

    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    8
    The honey in the basement is in peril!

    Wax moth and hive beetle will soon hatch out and ruin it without the bees maintaining it. Freeze or refrigerate to stop them. I would sort the brood frames and put back on the hive for the bees to clean out or for any surviving bees to hatch out in the hive. You could swap them for some frames of honey from the upper brood box even though they will be shallow. The bees will build some bur comb on them but it won't be a problem to clean up later.
     
  5. ccjersey

    ccjersey Member

    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    8
    The honey in the basement is in peril!

    Wax moth and hive beetle will soon hatch out and ruin it without the bees maintaining it. Freeze or refrigerate to stop them. I would sort the brood frames and put back on the hive for the bees to clean out or for any surviving bees to hatch out in the hive. You could swap them for some frames of honey from the upper brood box even though they will be shallow. The bees will build some bur comb on them but it won't be a problem to clean up later.
     
  6. Snowtop

    Snowtop New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    I took out the 2 frames of capped honey and replaced them with partially capped honey and comb frame. then I put the super back on. I will freeze the frames that have little honey and drawn comb. Is this correct?
     
  7. ccjersey

    ccjersey Member

    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Should be fine. The pests are almost always there, just kept suppressed by the bees. When we remove the frames and the bees cannot protect them, we find things we didn't know we had!

    There are several ways to protect and store dry comb but refrigeration/freezing is the only way I know of to store frames with honey, nectar or brood.
     
  8. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

    Messages:
    556
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    28
    I havent done this, but do you think vacuum packing those frames with honey would keep anything from living or growing inside of an airless environment and not have to freeze them?
     
  9. ccjersey

    ccjersey Member

    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Botulism........Ha! Ha! Not going there.........

    I don't know. The larvae of SHB seem to be able to stand most anything.

    I think vacuum sealing is usually done to prevent deterioration during freezer or refrigerated storage vs a stand-alone preservation method.
     
  10. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

    Messages:
    556
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    28
    actually I think( but not 100% sure) honey is one of those products that last forever without any treatment as it has micro anti bacterial properties, they say you can store honey in a container forever...I have used honey that was 30 plus years old with no ill effects...now storing them on frames with other impurities on the frame or any bugs or beetles may be something else..why doesnt op just take the honey off the frames and into jars?
     
  11. SuiGeneris

    SuiGeneris Member

    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Botulism spores will not germinate in pure honey; you'd have to dilute it in water (and keep it airtight) for that to be a risk.
     
  12. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,887
    Likes Received:
    16
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I have had wax moth and shb hatch on frames in my house. so last summer when I was waiting to borrow the group extractor, I bought a 20 pound CO2 tank, wrapped my super in heavy contractor trash bags, stuck the hose of the regulator inside, taped it up and turned the tank on low. Outdoors so I didn't kill myself.

    The 2 shb in the box were still alive after a week, but they hadn't touched my honey. I spent more on that rig than it cost for the extractor I bought next.
    Now to the real question, Snowtop, you got everything to the freezer or on the hive and being treated? I have to apologize for being absent, been a busy year.