Mite Zapper... truth or fiction?

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by Iddee, Apr 27, 2009.

  1. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  2. Robo

    Robo New Member

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    Heat may be an answer, but I think this particular method is a little complicated for the results of just killing the mites in one frame. Not to mention the issue with wax melting. Why not heat the whole hive and get the most bang for the buck -> http://robo.bushkillfarms.com/downloads ... omBees.pdf

    Heat and humidity retention is the main reason I have gone away from screened bottom boards. All the feral hives I remove have all the cracks sealed up as tight as can be. So far I have had good results, stronger spring build up and haven't treated for varroa in 3 years.

    Full article -> http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php?ac ... attach=481

    Full article -> http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php?ac ... attach=482
     

  3. Jim 134

    Jim 134 New Member

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    The mite zapper goes off at 44C (111F) and need about 8 minutes to be on.Will this melt bee wax ???




    BEE HAPPY Jim 134 :)
     
  4. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Seems impractical to me, and too fussy. The author claims it's superior to simple drone pupae culling because with drone culling you supposedly have to go into the hive twice, to freeze the drone frame, then put it back. But you don't have to do that- just pull out the drone frame, scrape off the caps of the capped drone brood, and replace the frame. One step, takes about 20 seconds. Voila, done. No need to hook up wires from the frame to a battery and then wait 2-5 minutes to heat it up. No need to actually buy anything. Drone culling by scraping/uncapping is as easy and quick as it gets if you are after the mites in the drone cells and don't want to use chemicals or apply any substances at all.

    The article says you could adjust the heat to kill the mites but not harm the drone pupae. I don't buy that. It's one thing to have just enough insecticide on a tick collar to kill the ticks on a dog but not harm the dog. It's another thing altogether to heat the whole dog up enough to kill all the ticks attached to it in 5 minutes but not harm the dog. :shock: I'd think soft moist drone pupae would be much more vulnerable to being zapped with heat than a tough hard shelled mite.

    In my opinion, though it's well intentioned, this is sort of like inventing a tiny heat seeking missile to kill a fly in your kitchen, when a simple flyswatter will do the job more reliably, cheaper, and faster.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    another Omie snip..
    Seems impractical to me, and too fussy.

    tecumseh:
    sound exactly right to me.
     
  6. efmesch

    efmesch New Member

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    Dedicating whole frames to raising drones comes at a loss of raising worker bees. Eliminating the few capped drone brood you find when doing regular inspections should obtain the same affect without reducing the worker population. Most of the year you'll find some drone brood inthe hive. Instead of ignoring it, scrape it. But before destroying all the drone brood, look at several larvae to see if you've got a Varroa problem.