Moisture content of honey

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Yankee11, Sep 14, 2013.

  1. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    I just got my refractometer in today. It did not come come with any calibration oil and very poor instructions. I checked a bucket of honey that I have already sold some out of and it reads around 20. I have 2 questions. 1. Does anyone know how to calibrate OR where to get the calibration oil? I have read to use some extra virgin olive oil and set to 71 brix. My meter has 3 scales on it. My olive oil is reading 69, if I adjusted to 71, that would actually put that Honey at around 18. 2. Should I be worried about the honey I have already sold at 20%? How critical is this? Seems like folks have been eating and selling honey long before we had refractometers.
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    A lot of folks just go with the shake test and are fine with that. I bought a refractometer as well, just for piece of mind, but at times it gives you anything but. I test as I extract and the variance between boxes can be frightening. The larger keeps have the advantage of a massive harvest with the bulk of it being capped. Us smaller keeps typically harvest along the way, grabbing the capped frames earlier, and then ending up with a larger variance later during final harvest.
    I usually keep boxes with a lot of uncapped frames in a small area with a dehumidifier for several days to reduce the moisture content.
    I am interested in Jack's method, where he essentially does the same thing with buckets of honey after he has extracted. I would find this an advantage. :thumbsup:
     

  3. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood Member

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    If any one knows of alternative methods of calibrating a refractometer, I would be interested as well. My grandson decided my refractometer was a toy kaleidoscope and that was the last I saw of the calibrating stone and oil. I have been unable to find replacements.
     
  4. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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  5. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    I have had good success using extra virgin olive oil to calibrate mine. That oil is very, very expensive and you have to buy it in bulk most places. The olive oil is fine. I wouldn't worry about the honey you have sold if you now believe it was in the 18% range.