Monarch Migration

Discussion in 'The Rural Life' started by Hobie, Oct 9, 2009.

  1. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    On the southern edge of Lake Erie, we have the honor of being on the Monarch migration path. Those fragile creatures fly all the way across the lake, a minimum of 30 miles, to reach land again. Some years, they reach the shores by the hundreds, and sit and rest. This year, the weather has been so cold and rainy, I worry about them. Yesterday, I picked up two, rather tattered, and sitting on the shore just past the water's edge. I carried them to some asters to rest. But I haven't seen the large numbers that have come through here in the past.

    Some day, I want to go to that town in Mexico where the monarchs all go to winter.
     
  2. Charles

    Charles New Member

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    I bet that is quite a site to see! Here's a photo I came across that shows a forest in Mexico just covered with Monarchs. It looks like the trees are changing colors but it's butterflies :)

    [attachment=0:337f2gtg]BrowerMonarch.JPG[/attachment:337f2gtg]
     

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  3. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    I know just a year or two ago, they had a freak freeze that killed bunches of monarchs down south. I hope it is just the fallout and the natural ebb and flow of nature.

    I noticed very few monarchs this year. I had many milkweed plants that never hosted a single egg. Not a good year.
     
  4. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    I was going to post yesterday after I came in from checking milkweed for Monarch larva (No larva, but 2 Monarchs: 1 female and 1 I couldn't get close enough to tell), but I forgot. Anyway, for those interested in Monarchs and their behavior, the University of Minnesota has a "citizen science" project: Monarch Larva Monitoring Project. It involves you regularly going out and checking an area with milkweed for larva and then reporting your findings to the university.

    The details may be found at http://www.mlmp.org. They have a schedule of training at various locations. By now they may even have training online.

    Walt