More fake news......

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by roadkillbobb, Aug 2, 2017.

  1. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    One with half a brain can see this article that was printed, is full of misleading info..and the studies claiming pesticides are not an issue with bee decline was paid for by the pesticide companies..take a read and see for yourself..the article itself tells you that the recovery is just bee keepers rebuilding their hives from the losses. not an overall increase in bees...

    Bees Are Bouncing Back From Colony Collapse Disorder
    By
    Alan Bjerga
    August 1, 2017, 6:29 PM EDT August 2, 2017, 12:00 AM EDT
    • Colony Collapse Disorder losses are down 27% from 2016
    • Varroa mite main scourge while beekeepers replenish hives
    The number of U.S. honeybees, a critical component in the agriculture industry, rose in 2017 from a year earlier, and deaths of the insects attributed to a mysterious malady that’s affected hives in North America and Europe declined, according a U.S. Department of Agriculture honeybee health survey released Tuesday.

    The number of commercial U.S. honeybee colonies rose 3 percent to 2.89 million as of April 1, 2017 compared with a year earlier, the Agriculture Department reported. The number of hives lost to Colony Collapse Disorder, a phenomenon of disappearing bees that has raised concerns among farmers and scientists for a decade, was 84,430 in this year’s first quarter, down 27 percent from a year earlier. Year-over-year losses declined by the same percentage in April through June, the most recent data in the survey.

    Still, more than two-fifths of beekeepers said mites were harming their hives, and with pesticides and other factors still stressing bees, the overall increase is largely the result of constant replenishment of losses, the study showed.


    “You create new hives by breaking up your stronger hives, which just makes them weaker,” said Tim May, a beekeeper in Harvard, Illinois and the vice-president of the American Beekeeping Federation based in Atlanta. “We check for mites, we keep our bees well-fed, we communicate with farmers so they don’t spray pesticides when our hives are vulnerable. I don’t know what else we can do.”

    Environmental groups have expressed alarm over the 90 percent decline during the past two decades in the population of pollinators, from wild bees to Monarch butterflies. Some point to a class of pesticides called neonicotinoids as a possible cause, a link rejected by Bayer AG and other manufacturers.

    To Save Bees It Would Help to Know Why They’re Dying: QuickTake

    In the USDA study, beekeepers who owned at least five colonies, or hives, reported the most losses from the varroa mite, a parasite that lives only in beehives and survives by sucking insect blood. The scourge, present in the U.S. since 1987, was reported in 42 percent of commercial hives between April and June this year, according to the USDA. That’s down from 53 percent in the same period one year earlier.

    Among other factors, beekeepers said 13 percent of colonies in the second quarter of this year were stressed by pesticides, 12 percent by mites and pests other than varroa and 4.3 by diseases. Bad weather, starvation, insufficient forage and other reasons were listed as problems with 6.6 percent of hives.

    Colony Collapse
    Colony Collapse, while not a main cause of loss, has perplexed scientists for more than a decade since the phenomena of bees seemingly spontaneously fleeing their hives and not returning was first identified in the U.S.

    In the survey, a hive loss was attributed to colony collapse if varroa or other mites were ruled out as a cause; few dead bees were found in a hive, a sign that they fled; a queen bee and food reserves were both seemingly normal pre-collapse; and food reserves were left alone after fleeing.

    Colony Collapse Disorder “isn’t really a disease, it’s a way to describe something that happens,” May said. Losses are highly variable, he said, and may be affected by farmers improperly spraying pesticides. “It’s really tricky” to tease out factors behind bee deaths, he said. “Maybe it’s pesticides, maybe it’s not. But when I eliminate everything else, it’s a distinct possibility.”

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    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is reviewing neonicotinoids, proposing bans on spraying them and several dozen other pesticides in fields where bees have been brought in to pollinate a crop.

    A pair of scientific studies in Science last month linked neonicotinoids to poor reproduction and shorter lifespans in European and Canadian bees. The research was funded in part by Bayer CropScience and Syngenta AG, the makers of imidacloprid, clothianidin and thiamethoxam.

    “There are numerous things impacting bee health,” Syngenta Chief Executive Officer Erik Fyrwald said in an interview in Brussels last month. “One of the very minor elements there is pesticides. So it’s amazing to us that the discussion is, as a whole, about pesticides. Not only pesticides, just specifically neonics.”

    — With assistance by Agnieszka De Sousa
     
  2. ccjersey

    ccjersey Member

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    I think just calling the article fake news does nothing to convince anyone that does not already agree with you. If you believe it is inaccurate fluff, refute it! Post links to sources that support your position, say why you disagree with what etc.

    Our president and his advisers have coined the term and use it to signal their supporters that they do not agree with the piece. I think anyone that has been paying attention has seen that the hurling of the labels of "fake news" and "alternative facts" are departures from the norm of civil discourse. I for one do not want to go down that road.

    I think the thing all the statistics on colony numbers that have been published are missing (at least in my local area) is the missing feral bee population. Of course its hard to survey that and the best it will ever be is an estimate.

    I decided to get bees because of the complete disappearance of honeybees in my local area. I grew up in the pre-varroa and pre-small hive beetle era and there was a large commercial honey operation that had bee yards scattered across the area every 3-4 miles. I presume this was the source of a significant number of swarms every year since they worked their hives no more than 3 or 4 times a year including feeding. The resulting feral bee colonies did very well in the low parasite pressure environment, issuing swarms in their turn, so there were lots of bees around.

    Varroa came in and the bee operation's owners were getting old and branching out into other enterprises, so they ceased operation. Add small hive beetles and fast forward 20 years and we had lost "our" bees. I can go a few miles and find feral colonies and have plans to collect some out of an abandoned building to sample those genetics, but in my area there were no bees.

    Getting off my soapbox now!
     

  3. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    I didnt post the article to convince anyone of anything, especially here where I would think most have a good idea on whats happening to the bee colonies...I will say one company and that should be all to answer your question.....MONSANTO.................. do your research and you will learn all the bad stuff...as were not allowed to discuss politics here, I will respect that...
    my main point of the article and you are right if I was talking to a non honey bee smart community to post links and info to back up...is that they state in the article themselves very casual, that the recovery of numbers was only based on the bee keepers having more bees just bringing up there colonies from the year before of a die off...or at least thats the way I interpret the article, any comments back are welcome...this is just a pleasant discussion...:)
     
  4. ccjersey

    ccjersey Member

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    In the piece you posted there is a link to another Bloomberg piece "To save the bees, it would help to know why they are dying: quick take"

    If you read that you will find a link to Randy Oliver's blog " Scientific bee keeping" I think you will like to have that website bookmarked for the comments on various bee topics, but especially for his comments on issues with pesticides. I have been devouring the blog as I have time ever since I found it.

    I cannot understand the belief that Monsanto, a multinational company is at the root of all the worlds problems. I have to tell you that as a farmer i am a customer of theirs, buying both "traited" GMO seed and their name brand ROUNDUP (glyphosate) herbicide. From my perspective I appreciate the ability to control some weeds and pests by using a resistant plant or chemicals that are safer (and cheaper) than what we used to use. Unfortunately the clean fields that we could expect after using Roundup are more a memory than a reality these days.