more honey

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Tyro, Sep 7, 2013.

  1. Tyro

    Tyro Member

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    photo(1).jpg

    We extracted our second batch of honey this past week.

    On the left, is the second batch (136lbs - so far; 2 five gallon pails left to bottle), in the middle is the first batch extracted in early August, on the right is my father-in-laws honey from Oklahoma.

    Honey simply amazes me.
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    :coolphotos:Boy, the middle one almost looks like water!!!!
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    here you would have a hard time selling the bottles in the center and on the left....
     
  4. Tyro

    Tyro Member

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    Perry,
    The middle one is very mild and INCREDIBLY sweet . I suspect it is mostly alfalfa. My wife really likes it.

    The one on the left has much more of a floral taste to it. I harvested the early batch before the goldenrod bloomed here - so it wouldn't surprise me if goldenrod is at least partially responsible for the darker color and floral taste.

    tec- you are probably right - my father-in-law generally gets between 400 and 600lbs of the honey on the right each year. He never has any trouble selling out. He also gets an additional 100-200lbs of honey that is almost exclusively blackberry (He just harvested that two weeks ago). It is about as dark as his wildflower honey, but it is the best honey my wife and I have ever tasted! I would trade him 5 bottles of any of mine for 1 of his blackberry!

    Mike
     
  5. bamabww

    bamabww New Member

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    Interesting photos. Thanks for sharing them.
     
  6. Bees In Miami

    Bees In Miami New Member

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    Hmmm...the wife likes the INCREDIBLY sweet one....It sure looks like sugar syrup to me! Did you feed your bees?

    ​I would buy the FIL honey, from Oklahoma....
     
  7. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    One gets to wondering: Does the color influence the flavor or is just that the darker honeys seem to have more flavor? Is the association of color to flavor a cause and effect relationship?:?:
     
  8. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Nice comparison photo! My honey looks like the first one whether I pull it early, mid or late summer.
     
  9. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Same yard, same hives and comb, early versus fall flow.
    colours of honey 007.jpg
     
  10. TreeWinder

    TreeWinder New Member

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    Perry, what nectar source is available in the fall in NS that makes the dark honey?
     
  11. Tyro

    Tyro Member

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    My bees got sugar bricks in February -they were gone in May. Supers went on the hives in June - so no sugar syrup in the supers.

    Up here, perhaps surprisingly, I sell out of the lightest honey first. No accounting for regional tastes I guess.

    I have seen other beekeepers up here produce honey as light or lighter than the middle one. The monks at the Abbey in Richardton regularly have honey that is light. I suspect alfalfa because I have read (somewhere) that pure alfalfa honey is graded as 'water white'.

    Perry - cool photo! The fall honey almost looks like buckwheat. It seems as though fall honeys (regardless of region) are generally darker than earlier harvests. Perhaps the floral nectar becomes more concentrated as the summer winds down - the flowers aren't producing as much nectar going into fall and so the elements responsible for color become more concentrated?

    Just a thought.

    Mike
     
  12. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Goldenrod and Aster are the late nectar flows here, but the really dark stuff was an anomaly for sure, no accounting for what they may have got into.
    Out west (BC) light out-sold dark 3 to 1. Here in the east (NS) it is almost exactly reverse. Go figure! :???: :lol:
     
  13. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    3 or 4 years ago, all of my honey was almost black? The bee club accused me of selling my used motor oil.:lol: It sold out quick and customers were asking for more, hasn't happen since and i don't have a clue what they made it from. Had a club member call me yesterday, saying he has some bad tasting honey:eek:, said it had a kerosene taste:shock:, wanted to know if i ever had this problem, or if i knew what it was? I've never had or heard of it before, any ideas? Jack
    PS. he said it hadn't fermented. Tyro, not trying to steal your thread, just thought it would be a good time to ask.
     
  14. Tyro

    Tyro Member

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    Jack,

    No worries! A couple of years back, my father-in-law had some really bad tasting honey too. Most of his honey was fine - just like every other normal year. But one batch, from a group of hives at a separate yard, had a TERRIBLE aftertaste (I tried it). It started out tasting like honey, but finished with just a horrible, almost intensely sour/bitter taste.

    He looked up some flowers that were reported to produce foul tasting honey - but I can't remember now what they were. It hasn't ever happened since though. He ended up feeding it all back to the bees. They didn't seem to mind.