More Pestilence upon our bees!

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by Crofter, Jan 1, 2013.

  1. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    Just received a bulletin from Ontario Ministry of Food and Agriculture informing that new regulations are being considered to expand the list of inspected for and reportable disease and pests of bees.

    TROPILAELAPS is a new mite migrating to our european bee in Asia and Australia etc. but dont know if it is into the north american bees. It looks llike they see it coming anyway. Also danger from pests hosted by the cape honey bee, asian honey bee, dwarf honey bee, giant honey bee, giant asian hornet. On their original hosts they can co exist but when they jump to our European bee it is much more deadly.

    In view of the climate of economic restraint there is very likley no funding for increased inspection and enforcement. The responsibility most likely fall on the beekeepers. It sure is not getting any easier!
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    And yet in our province our politicians succumbed to pressure from the blueberry growers and opened up our border for the first time to the importation of Ontario bees for pollination purposes, this despite the fact there has been detection of SHB in Ontario. Go figure, the government sacrifices one industry to placate another.
     

  3. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    On our side of the border, most politicans are lawyers, they set on there lard butts trying to figure out how to get $'s from working people without having to put out to much effort. With the population explosion over the last decade, the price of farmland, and equipment, compared to the cost to produce a product ready for market, and what the food producers get for there labor? The politicans keep making big deals for the almighty $, not knowing or care what problems they cause. Someday(sooner than they think) when they run out of food and have to eat that dollar bill, or God forbid,:shock: have to do manual labor. they might wise up. Jack
     
  4. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    That would be nice to see, but I doubt it'll happen in our lifetime (but anything's possible).
     
  5. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    That mite will not overwinter in Northern Climates, particularly Canada.
     
  6. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    I read a bit on that mite and since it does not live long in the phoretic mode I think camero7 is correct. Perhaps though if it is on imported bees to Canada, they may scuttle away south of the border and thrive where bees dont go entirely broodless in the winter. Maybe the same applies to the list of oriental bees that harbor viruses that can transfer to our european bee. Seems like a stretch! In the meanwhile they have been letting the number of bee inspectors dwindle!
     
  7. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Nova Scotia has a part time Bee Health Advisor. She 's a nice lady but....
    Last year the largest beekeeper (corp) in the province (left our association a few years ago) and also happens to be the largest grower and exporter of low bush (wild) blueberries, was allowed to bring in over 4,000 hives from Ontario for pollination. Only 10% had to be inspected. Two beekeepers (I am familiar with both) were hired to carry out the inspections. No disrespect meant to either keep but I don't know that either have ever seen a SHB.
     
  8. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    Doesn't take a rocket scientist to see SHB. Never saw one until a couple years ago. Knew immediately what they were. They don't live well in the north. I don't worry about them here and I'm south of you
     
  9. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    I worry that new or intending beekeepers are detered by talk of all the pests and diseases that can affect bees.

    The problems can occur but bees and beekeepers are able to cope.

    In the UK, we have been on the look-out for 4 exotic pests for the last few years. So far no sightings. The reported spread of the Asian Hornet (Asian Predatory Wasp ----Vespa velutina) in Europe is noteworthy. I am sure that parts of the US would be suitable habitat for this beastie------ very large nests.
     
  10. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Better to go in with eyes wide open, than have some one tell you all you need is a hive you install the bees and wait and gather the honey. You can make your investment back the first year. They get in and get discouraged when the reality sets in.