Moved my be hives why are the bee's not with it?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by davismisa04, Sep 19, 2010.

  1. davismisa04

    davismisa04 New Member

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    I had moved my bee's last nigt from one corner of my yard to the other there is still one hive over there that I would like to move tonight but I dont know if that is a good idea because the bee's that I moved last night left the hived they where in wich is the one I moved to the new location and are with the other hive and where it is located. What I was wanting to know is will my honey bee's come back to the hive they where in wich is the one that i moved last night? Should I go ahead and move the other bee hive to the new location or should I move the hive that I moved last night back to the orignal space? Please Help Im a new bee keeper and I have no idea what to do here.
     
  2. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    Davismisa04, I'm sure much more knowledgeable beekeepers will be answering later, but I'll get started with why the bees left.

    Think of bees finding their way home with GPS units. You moved the hive, but as far as the bees are concerned, they still live in the original location, and they went home. That's why they left.

    There's a saying that you can move bees less than 2 feet or more than 2 miles without problem. I'm not convinced that's completely true, but it's the general idea that bees know where they live: a couple of feet is insignificant, 2 miles is so far they are forced to reorient, and in between the beekeeper must do something to make them reorient (like facing a different direction, putting sticks and brush on the hive so it looks different, screening them in for a day or 2, all of these actions, etc.).

    I suspect there are still a few bees in the moved hive (Queen, nurse bees)? That could be information that the more experienced beeks might need to know to be of help. I'm hoping they'll say you can move the hive back and all will be well with the world. I hope.

    Walt
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Go ahead and move the other hive. They will return to the old location for a day or two, then relocate to the new location. If too many go to one hive, after a week, exchange the two hives location and the population will balance out.
     
  4. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    dittos on iddees advice.
     
  5. samo's beekeeping

    samo's beekeeping New Member

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    if you want to move the beehouses in small distances, i know 2 ways to do it.
    if you move the beehive for 50-70 cm every day nothing happends.
    the other way is to close the entrance, move the beehives and open the entrance the other day. if it's hot put a feeder with light sirop20%.
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    recently I did a take out for an old farmer (the real plus being he provided me with an excellent location in a direction I had wanted to expand my operation for some time). when I got the bees in the box I placed the hive on a two wheel cart. about ever two to three days the old farmer would move the hive 3 to 6 feet and after about a month he had moved it up next to the desired place he wanted this new/old hive to reside.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    ps... I quite liked Walt's description and will add that you can confine bees for much longer periods than most folks think. You do need to keep the hive shaded and if confinement is in hot weather some water is essential.