moving a hive

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Zookeep, Sep 20, 2011.

  1. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    how long does it take for foragers to forget where the hive sits and come out of the hive and reorient them selves before flying off to work? I wanna move a hive 100 feet and was wondering if I could screen the opening for 24 hours or something. :confused:
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Move it at dark and block the entrance, but not enough that they can't get out.
    A wad of grass, a leafy branch, etc. Just make them work to get out and they will reorientate.
    There may be a few return to the original site, but they will find the hive in a couple of days.
     

  3. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    thnx it saves me from moving it 5 miles then moving it again :yahoo:
     
  4. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    It is nice to think they will find the hive in a few days but not gonna happen. You will lose a few foragers unless you move the hive in small steps of about 2 feet. Sealing the hive to reduce imprinting and encouraging them to reorient with a branch or grass will help, but you will always get the old girls that do not learn any more.
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    "It is nice to think they will find the hive in a few days but not gonna happen."

    Move it today and see how many are in the old position in 3 days.
    What you will see is bees returning to the old spot, making a 90, and going straight to the new location. I would call that finding the hive.

    Or move it 5 miles, let the foragers that don't orient get lost, move it back and do the same again. How many have you lost then?
     
  6. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    I moved a couple of hives this spring and didn't want to move to another yard or move in small steps. So I moved them and put a nuc with an empty drawn frame in the old location... that evening I just took that nuc over in front of the hives and took off the top. Next morning it was empty and the bees were in the hives... had to do the same thing the next day with about 20% of the bees. Didn't put it out the 3rd day and only saw a couple of bees circling in the old area.
     
  7. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    I have had success moving hives and making splits about 10-20 yards away by moving them at dusk when most everyone is home, and putting some twigs or a pine branch right in front of the entrance, forcing them to stop, climb over the twigs and take note the next morning before they go off. They seem to immediately do orientation figure 8's, and I haven't seen many going to the old location the next day. I haven't sealed them in.
     
  8. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    I moved 2 of my hives last night to opposite corners of my 30 acre property. These hives were next to each other and started robbing one another so rather than let them continue wasting a valuable massive goldenrod flow I moved them. Today there are a handful of bees flying around the old spot and each hive has a steady flow of foragers coming in with pollen. There is a fistful sized clump of bees on a third hive that I left on the original site. I didn't lose many bees and I didn't have to move them 5 miles.
     
  9. Dbure

    Dbure New Member

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    I have 4 hives that I would like to move to a location that is about 120 miles from their current location. What is the best time of year to do that? I would think that early spring might be a good time before the bees start coming out in large numbers. What is the best way to move them long distance? :dontknow:
     
  10. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Early spring, as the first small flow starts is the best time. Screen them in at night, or before light in the morning, then move them early in the morning. Move them on an open back truck or trailer. They need the wind on them to keep from overheating.
     
  11. Dbure

    Dbure New Member

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    Thank you Iddee. :drinks: