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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have heard and read all sorts of horror stories about moving a TBH long distance.

Last Friday night, I loaded up a 4' TBH and moved it to my dad's house, 160 miles away. I waited until all of the foragers came back in the hive, around 900PM. Screened the two holes that were open, and wrapped a window screen around the rest of the hive. Loaded it in the back of my truck and headed to Dixie county.

I arrived there around midnight and unloaded the hive, removed all the screen and set it up.

The next morning I opened the hive to see what the damage was. No comb had fallen, none had moved and the bees were steady going and coming.

We used to see bees around his farm, but the last 5 years, there have been none. We make cane syrup up there in October, November, and when we were grinding the cane to extract the juice, the bees used to be all over the stalks. Now all you fight off is yellow jackets.

I watched them working Sunday, and they have already found something north of the hive that has their interest. I did not see them bringing in any pollen but they were steady coming out of the hive and flying over the top of it and heading north.

I will check on the hive in a month or two and see what the results are. Dad will be planting corn and squash up there this month and hopefully they will help with the pollination. If not, next year they will be on the palmetto that there are hundreds of acres of.

I plan on leaving this hive up there and possibly doing a split and starting another one to leave up there. I will not be worried about moving one of these hives again.
Robert
 

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This was one of the main reasons I didn't build a TBH this spring. I wasn't 100% sure of where my hives would be located and had heard the horror stories as well.

One tip I've received and will pass along (NOTE: I haven't kept a TBH before (yet), so I can't confirm if the advice is pertinent or not):
After a move, the bees may be more inclined to build lots of bridge comb to the sidewalls of the hive. You may think to increase your inspections to once a week for a while to keep this in check.

Great news on your move. Sounds like you have a great yard and that it went as well as you can ever expect.
 

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I built one knowing it wouldn't be moved. So far they have impressed the heck out of me. I think they are on the 18th frame now, and doing very well. The only problem I've seen so far is the last few honey combs have some cross comb. But the brood comb is perfect, so I'm not worried about it. And the observation window gives me pleasure every evening :)
 

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Sounds like you done good! Good luck with the move. Are you building another for where you live?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have the original one that I started with at my property. I also have two langs in this yard.

I will build another to replace it as I have found that I have better luck with the TBH than I do with the langs. They seem to build up faster and to me, they are easier to manipulate. The two langs are coming along and I have put supers on them in the last month.
Robert
 
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