My beekeeping location

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Eddy Honey, Mar 20, 2011.

  1. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    I tried to make a picture of where my bees will be.
    Does this look ok? I know the closest field will be tomatoes (no good) but maybe they will work the surrounding fields as well? Will they go into the woods after the honeysuckle, blackberries, and all the flowering trees?

    Thanks,
    Ed
     

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  2. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Duo_core, yes they will go into the woods, i have hives in the woods and most of the neighboring area around is woods. There are trees and plants they work in those area's that i never knew they worked and they produce lots of excess honey for me. I intend to put more hives in the woods this spring. :thumbsup: Jack
     

  3. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    Ok, thanks..that is good to know.
    I'm going to go ahead and order my beginners kit along with a childs beekeeping outfit for the kids and some Benadryl lol j/k.

    When it comes I'll set it up and then order some bees. Could someone walk me through your way of putting the bees into the hive?

    Once they're in there do I just walk away and not worry about them? Do I have to harvest honey and when? If I do't harvest it will the bees take care of it? Will the colony only grow to the size of the hive I provide?

    Lots of questions I know.

    Ed

    Edit: In shopping for bee clothing should I get a full suit (for the kids) or just the veil and gloves?
     
  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    If you are going to order bees now is the time, they do sell out.

    As for getting bees in the hive look to you tube for some good video.

    When you hive your package of bees they will need to be fed until there is a good flow on, 1 to 1 sugar water syrup. One of the biggest mistakes I see with new keeps is looking in on the bees everyday to see their progress.
    If you buy package bees most likely you will not get any excess honey the first year, not saying you can't steal a frame maybe.

    If they outgrow the hive they will swarm, need to keep plenty of room for them by adding supers.

    What is in your beginners kit?

    I would recommend getting two hives to start off with, easy to compare the growth rates and if one is crashing you will have resources to help boost it back.

    A bee club or at least a mentor in your area is very very helpful also.

    Good luck with your adventure and keep the questions coming.
     
  5. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    Here's what I'm getting:

    The 8-Frame Hive is the only hive that we use here at Brushy Mtn. It is easier to work and we like the fact that all of our equipment is the same size. If you have back problems, if you want to simplify your operation or you just want a few hives to spruce up your garden, this is the one.

    The Cypress Garden Hive with Copper Top includes: 1- 8-Frame Copper A-line Top, 2 medium cypress garden supers, and 1-cypress hive stand. All assembled .

    Includes: 16- grooved top bar and grooved bottom bar medium frames, 1- I.P.M. bottom board, and 1 inner cover. All assembled. You will also receive 16 sheets of no hook crimp wire foundation, which you will insert into the frames. Also; a hatless veil, a pair of large plastic gloves, a Brushy Mountain Smoker w/ smoker fuel, a bee brush, a 10" hive tool, a plastic entrance feeder, a beginner's book and a Garden Hive instructional DVD.
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I would order one more medium super with frames and foundation. The shipping will be nearly the same. You will, hopefully, need it the first season. I would also call a few breeders now, to ensure you will be able to buy bees. All breeders sell out early every year, so get your order in as soon as possible.

    Yes, there will be many things you have to do to get the bees through the season and ready to survive a New Jersey winter. Read, read, and read. Then come here and ask questions.
     
  7. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    Ok, I'll order 1 more 8 frame hive (comes with 2 supers, frames, and foundation). I suppose I'll need another feeder as well?
     
  8. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    What I'm saying is, you will need three boxes on one hive in order to get them ready for winter. Maybe even four. I meant to order one more medium super to go on the initial hive.

    Then if you decide to start with two hives, which is a good idea, you need three supers for it, along with top, bottom, and feeder.
     
  9. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    When we started out I just got the kids each a veil and gloves. They can wear a good long sleeve shirt and jeans for protection... sometimes the boys will duct tape around the legs of their jeans if we have a hive that's being a little more aggressive. My thinking was just that they grow so quickly a suit wouldn't last long.... I was right.
     
  10. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    Ok I re-did the order and got just the veil and gloves for each kid and myself. The wife can tough it out without protection lol j/k.

    I was able to order the bees from the same place and it's semi-close enough that I'll take a road trip to pick up the equiptment and then another road trip in the first week of May to pick up the bees. I'll want to have everything set up before the bees arrive. My only concern is we're leaving on a camping trip a week after the bees arrive so I'll need to talk the horse feeding woman into checking on the bee feeder. Is there some way I can feed the bees for a week without having to have someone add more sugar water?
     
  11. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    You can set the feeders away from the hive after the first week. A hundred to 200 feet from the hive would work. She can change the jars at night, when no bees are flying. They will find the feeders anywhere in your yard. That way, she won't have to get near the hive nor the bees.
     
  12. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    Thanks Iddee. Also, I see some hives come with wax foundations vs plastic/wood foundations. What difference does it make? Do the bees need me to supply wax?
     
  13. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    There are many choices there. I suggest wired wax foundation and wood frames for a beginner and maybe experiment with others after 2 or 3 years.
     
  14. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Location, location, location <this applies both to buying real estate and to setting down bees.

    the first thing I typically concern myself with here is a good year long source of water <have you ever toted water to 1000 hives???

    soil fertility... if one has a choice of where to set down hives then a geological survey of soil for an area is an extremely valuable tool. In my experience some sites do well early on (sandy type soils) and others (clay and loam) a bit later. some places are extremely marginal (acid type soils marked by dense pine trees for example is a bit like setting a hive down on a beach).
     
  15. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    No pine trees here lol. Mostly maple, gum, oak, hickory, and a few holly..surrounded by farms.

    I understand that if all goes well this coming winter 2011/2012 and the bees winter well, I will have honey to harvest in the summer of 2012. How much honey, if things go well should I plan on harvesting? I'm getting 2 hives in early May.

    Thanks,
    Ed
     
  16. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I always hate that question. The answer sounds like I'm being a smart aleck. The truth is, one could give yo 30 lb. this year and 100 lb. next year, while the hive right next to it may not give you any this year or next. You just never know until it happens.
     
  17. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    I hated asking that question lol. I should have said, "how much honey in a perfect world..." lol ...but thanks...my wife asked me because she was thinking about containers for when the time comes.
     
  18. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Five gallon buckets or larger for when the time comes. After extracting, it needs to set for 3 days to a week before bottling. It takes that long for the sediment to go to the top and bottom. You can then bottle clean honey without air bubbles, pollen, etc. Plenty of time to order containers after that. A medium super yields approx. 10 quarts, or 30 lb. That will give you an idea of how much is being made as the season advances.
     
  19. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    One would think that there would be a cutoff date depending on geographical location for when to leave the honey if the hive is full.

    For instance if it was late August and I checked the hive and it was full I would think I should leave it for them to use in the winter. Come late October it starts cooling off in these parts. Am I on the right path?
     
  20. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Close, but it goes by weight. Here in NC we leave 40 to 60 lbs. of honey and pollen for the winter. That is a deep and a medium, including the broodnest.. You would likely leave 60 to 75 lb., or two deeps, although you need to check with someone nearer your location to be sure.