My bees died, extra frames of honey

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by hawkreborn, Feb 20, 2014.

  1. hawkreborn

    hawkreborn New Member

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    So my bees kicked the bucket. Looks like they just froze to death, maybe due to moisture. But I have a couple frames still full of honey. Its gonna be another 2 months before my packages arrive. What should I do with these frames? I'd like to put them in the new hives if that's ok. But I'm also worried that in that time when things start to warm up, some beetles and such might start munching away and destroy it.
     
  2. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    Put them in a plastic bag and store in freezer until you need them, just let them warm up before you put them in the hive. And you are right if you leave them in the hive every insect will be after it and destroy the whole hive, I would try to save all the frames if possible.

    Ken
     

  3. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Kebee beat me to it. That will be grade A food for your new bees. I was just thinking yesterday I need to beat the warm weather and sort out my dead outs to save the honey frames and comb in general from moths and beetles alike. I wish I had a big freezer I could dedicate to frames.
     
  4. hawkreborn

    hawkreborn New Member

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    Thanks for the tips! I did it! :)
     
  5. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    save any comb the same way, you want as many frames built up saved as you can to give the new bees as big a head start as you can
     
  6. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Put the frames in plastic bags or a bug free area the weather in most of the northern 1/2 of the US and Canada has been cold enough to kill beatles and moths. You know what the weather temperatures in your area has been so nature in many areas has taken care of the freezing just get it stored safe before it get re infected in the spring when the weather warms up.
     
  7. neatyardian

    neatyardian New Member

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    I had same problems for past two winters here in WNC area . I wrote before about my idea with internal bee heaters and I happy to report my bees are doing much better.
     
  8. hawkreborn

    hawkreborn New Member

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    Internal bee heaters? o_O Like putting a low wattage heating element inside the hive during winter? o_O
     
  9. neatyardian

    neatyardian New Member

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    I used 2 gallons internal feeder. I filled it with water. Placed 10 gal. Aquarium heater. It has thermostat keeping temps at 72f. I replaced lid on it to solid wood. Bees are using less energy to stay warm. Feeding patties are softened easier for bees to eat. This season I have not lost any bees . Good feeling after two bad seasons.
     
  10. hawkreborn

    hawkreborn New Member

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    Wow, that's genius. Those heaters cost next to nothing, way cheaper than having to buy more packages. Thanks for the tip. I'll try that next winter :)