My First hive inspection

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Medic1259, May 6, 2012.

  1. Medic1259

    Medic1259 New Member

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    Well it was day 4 since I installed a 4 frame nuc into my 10 frame Deep. I did the install at the yard where I picked up the nuc. I saw the marked Queen (yellow) an saw Brood at that time. Moved them to my yard and installed a hive top feeder with 1:1 and Honey -Bee- Healthy. Covered it up and lt it sit. It has been raining on and off the last 3 days and today has been a nice day.. mid 60's some sun little to no breeze.. I have seen the girls out and brining back pollen.

    Ok so I make some more feed, light my smoker don my jacket and vail, Hive tool, brush , frame grip and camera and head to the hive...

    About 20 girls flying around... I open up the top and remove the feeder ( which dosen't look like was even touched) no girls in there... Remove the inner cover...and see the girls working. I pop one of the un-drawn frames out to give room and start my insprction.
    P5060002.jpg
    For reference I will uses #'s 1-10 from left to right to describe what I Saw. #'s 1,2,8,9,10.. nothing at all not even a single bee. # 3 Left side empty right side 2 small clusters looks like starting to draw some wax.
    P5060003.jpg
    Frame 4 Left side (first look) 3/4 full wth bees larvae , some capped drone... Right side Has start od a supersede cell?

    P5060005.jpg P5060004.jpg

    Frames 5 and 7 Both sides full of bees, Frame 6 Right side bees Left sid a caped Supersede cell?
    P5060011.jpg P5060012.jpg

    Didnt find the queen and started to panic looked again and Found her on Frame 4

    P5060018.jpg

    Closed everything up.. filled feeder to top and wlaked away... Cirls were very calm.. No Gloves , Few buzzed me but that was it. No stings..

    Ok now for my questions:

    What to do with the queen cells?

    Why didnt they take any of the feed? also when had it off and full none even checked it out.

    Should they have drawn out more frames by now?

    Laying pattern look normal? Sow some capped but the full frames couldnt see what was under the girls..

    Any advice? Anything I should check for? Should I keep the reducer on still?
     

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  2. dr.buzz

    dr.buzz New Member

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    No harm in leaving the reducer on.
    Nice looking queen cell.
    Lots of package nucs supersede, maybe because of the way certain operations raise queens that aren't very good quality. But if they want to replace the queen, it's usually advisable to let them. They probably won't kill the old queen until the new queen is laying, and they may not kill her at all, and you'd have two queens laying. If it was me, I'd observe and let them do their thing.
    I also wouldn't worry about them not taking feed right away. I used to worry if my little splits didn't eat a lot right off the bat, but it's usually fine. They don't have so much brood to feed and aren't desperate to draw new comb at first. Their feeding will increase gradually, but then so will the forager population, so don't be surprised if they start to eat the syrup for a bit, then stop because the foragers are bringing in sufficient nectar.

    As far as that open queen cell.....doesn't look like any larvae in any of the adjacent cells, so I'd guess that was an old one....
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  4. Medic1259

    Medic1259 New Member

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    Thanks.. Being this was the first inspection I have EVER did I got a lil nervious about first not finding the queen and also by finding the queen cell.
    If the queen was failing would they bee so calm?
    Should they have started to draw out some of the other frames by now?
    Would I be wrong with checking the feeder in a day or so?
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Can you check the feeder without opening the hive? if not, then don't. They should have enough forage now to not need more feed.
     
  6. Medic1259

    Medic1259 New Member

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    I can just remove the top cover..
    P5060024.jpg P5060025.jpg
     
  7. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    Medic, what kind of feeder is this? Is that plastic insert? Thanks.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I myself would knock the cells down and as far as I can tell from the picture both cells are uncapped and the one that appears to be longer is a dud that has been subjected to some shock (it is simply way too long). my worst fear would be the longer cell would emerge and displace a perfectly good queen with one that will almost invariable be defective.

    small boxes of bees will construct cells for any number of reason and if the hive is headed by a young queen most time the existing queen will take care of these her self (and thereby knock these down if the queen is robust is optional). stress of some kind is quite typically the underlying cause of queen cells production in these kinds of situation... stress may be lack of feed (you picture suggest this as likely cause), too many bees in the box, a simple a misplacement of frames by the beekeeper, etc, etc, etc.
     
  9. Medic1259

    Medic1259 New Member

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    The Long one is capped. I did not see it on the orginal install, but I found the queen on the first frame that day so I really didnt look at the rest. So you think I should go in ther and destroy the 2 queen cells?
     
  10. Medic1259

    Medic1259 New Member

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  11. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Not familiar with that particular feeder.

    Is it intended to be positioned above the inner cover or on top of the frames ?

    Under some conditions bees will not travel into an up and over feeder to get the syrup. I prefer to place tray feeders just above the frames (no inner cover). To try to encourage bees into a tray feeder, I like to dribble a little syrup down through the feeder entrance onto the bees/top bars. The bees will hopefully follow the syrup trail
     
  12. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    medic1259, i would be inclined to do as tecumseh said, and knock the cells down.....
    this is a package of bees you just hived, queens don't start laying 'right out of the box'. give her a week or so. bees construct and remove cells all the time. best way i can explain this, your package bees were dumped into a package from a hive with a laying queen....
    so the bees are thinking the queen they have now, is not doing her job....so they are building cells. they are ready to go.
    give the queen you have a chance to lay. if she doesn't and the bees keep building cells, (and they will), then let them decide for themselves.:grin:
     
  13. Medic1259

    Medic1259 New Member

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    It was a 4 frame nuc.. should i still take out the queen cell
     
  14. Medic1259

    Medic1259 New Member

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    At first I put it above the inner cover... on sunday I put it on top of the frames directly then the inner cover on top of it... Tonight I will check to see if they are atleast comming up to feed.. Unless Someone thinks I should wait a few days...
     
  15. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    tecumseh said:
    " my worst fear would be the longer cell would emerge and displace a perfectly good queen with one that will almost invariable be defective."

    if it were me, i would. give your current queen time to lay. when you do, then leave the hive alone for 5-7 days, don't be poking around in there, unless to feed. everytime you open the hive causes stress and sets the bees back 2 or 3 days, and also can make them ornery:grin:
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2012
  16. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    when did you hive these girlies? last week? what day?
     
  17. Medic1259

    Medic1259 New Member

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    I hived them on Thursday.. I really dont plan on going into the hive till the weekend. besides cking the feeder which I could do with no smoke and not disturb the hive.

    (OK I am a dummy .. I thought it was 4 days for the first inspection... Th,Fri,Sat, SUN ... But if you dont count thurs it was only 3 days.
     
  18. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    i would just wait now medic, until the weekend to see what's going on. from an egg laid in a queen cell, to a new queen hatching will take 16 days, before she emerges, so you have time to decide. :grin:

    day 1, egg laid.
    day 8, cell sealed
    day 16 queen emerges

    more than likely your nuc was made up several days before your pickup?
    also, the same principles apply to hiving a nucleus as a package of bees with regards to the queen laying, my earlier post #12. (unless the nucleus hive was made with an established laying queen before being sold).

    frames of bees from a laying hive are placed in a nucleus hive, and are given a new queen. The bees are ready to go, more often than not these queens take a little bit of time to start laying.
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2012