My first queen

Discussion in 'Raising Queens' started by Daniel Y, Sep 7, 2012.

  1. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    I started a trap out early last month. As a result I had 19 queen cells started on two frames of brood. We left one frame with the trap out and moved one of them with some of the bees to a nuc to my back yard. Technically this nuc is my daughters first hive. So it could be argued that this is my daughters first queen. the egg woudl have been laid either Aug 12th or 13th. We inspected for a laying queen today which was actually one day to early. But it was check today or wit until Monday. Patience is for doctors so we checked. Not only did we find eggs in a good pattern. We actually saw the queen. You can tell she is the daughter of my parent queen. A wonderful golden yellow. I consider my queen the best we have and am not liking the overall disposition of this feral hive. So I am anxious for this new lady to replace them with her own brood.

    Mainly I am just tickled to death. the last week has had a lot of anxiety associated with it. waiting and hoping for the best, knowing we are pushing it as far as the lateness of the season. My gut tells me that we barely have enough time and I run a pretty good record with my gut.

    Anyway I wanted to just share this milestone in our beekeeping story. We didn't have a camera with us so I hope to get a picture of her sometime in the future. first time never happens again.

    I also suspect that if I really get into bees in a serious way it will be in bee production and queen rearing. I don't know if I will ever attempt queen breeding. but I tend to gravitate to the rearing of anything. I can't just have a dog, I have to breed them. 176 of them at one time in my life. 700 rabbits, 24 head of hogs, horses, cattle, earth worms, meal worms and most of all tropical fish. I can't just have an aquarium. it has to be a dozen aquariums and I have breed some of the most difficult fish possible. So rearing of queens sort of fits well with my interests and my tendency's. Who knows what next year or the year after will result in. Btu for now this is a very exciting as well as a great relief. Nothing like seeing those first eggs at the bottom of the cells.

    The bees are still pissy though so I don't think she has been laying for long.

    It did cross my mind that they may still be discontent and abscond as a result. Does this concern have an merit? I know they are not likely to leave brood and they now have brood. Is there anything else I should do to help prevent them up and moving?

    I know wrong time of year, brood and a queen to keep them anchored. I am probably being an annoying newb with even worrying about it. But I am also not certain so asking anyway.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Congratulations! I'm holding off until Sunday - giving 10 days from the italian's ejection - before I check on what I hope is my new queen.

    I do not know much about queen rearing but I do know food and brood make good anchors, especially in fall / winter.
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    They won't leave without the queen, and why would she leave? She was born there.
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a Daniel snip..
    It did cross my mind that they may still be discontent and abscond as a result. Does this concern have an merit? I know they are not likely to leave brood and they now have brood. Is there anything else I should do to help prevent them up and moving?

    I know wrong time of year, brood and a queen to keep them anchored. I am probably being an annoying newb with even worrying about it. But I am also not certain so asking anyway.

    tecumseh:
    it to me just suggest a questioning and inquisitive mind and certainly there ain't much wrong with that.

    sometime I like to leave well enough alone once I have had my questioned answered. constantly poking about in a small population of bees where the queen may not have laid up that strongly yet does have the possibilities to convince the workers that there is something wrong with the queen and for them to first murder and then replace her. absconding is another matter but I would suspect that any population with significant africanized genetics does have this potential to abscond when messed with excessively.
     
  5. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    I would think you have the season working in your favor the bees are aware of the time of year and the chances of survival if they abscond. By spring all the original trapped out bees will be replaced with daughters from the queen. The only unanswered question is who did she mate with? That could have a impact on what her daughters are like and weather they want to supersede a good queen because she is looked at as being inferior by her daughters.
    Beekeeper in ares of AHB may need to keep there hives headed by bought queen from reputable queen breeders that not only control the queens but also the drone populations in the mating areas.
     
  6. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    Quality of drones in this area is questionable based upon a swarm I captured earlier this year and what I observe in the trap out I am doing. The hive I purchased as a nuc in May seems to me to be of much better quality. I am taking all this into consideration in regard to future management. I do have the source of better genetics available to me in that I bought my nuc locally. I also have that person to consult in what they do to have that quality. I don't think I will allow my queens to go very far on breeding with local drones though. I imagine the decline in quality will be quick.
     
  7. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    That is the the big unanswered question until you try the queen you have no way of knowing her and her offsprings temperament. Breeders are constantly selecting and culling stock in order to try and achieve the perfect queen for their environment, and a product that is [FONT=&amp]consistence. a lot of times their queens can be varied in behavior and temperament.[/FONT]. If you don't know what traits the breeder is selecting for ask. Maybe what he is looking for in a queen are not traits you want. I know of beekeepers that select for honey gathering regardless of temperament. others that will avoid a queen if she is from a swarm cause she has the swarming gene regardless of how crowded the hive was.
     
  8. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    I went over to move frames from the trap out to a 5 frame nuc yesterday. this is the second hive that made a new queen. Open and capped brood appears to be in every available cell and the bees have started drawing a frame of foundation. I never did see the quen but the bees did move right into the new box which I am taking as a sign I got her moved.

    Looks like 2 for 2 and the second nuc will be coming home this evening where we can give it intensive care.

    In the mean time I am looking for information on getting two nucs through the winter. Bee populaiton will most likely be small although we are working on that. We will continue to trap bees from the wall and add them to the nucs as long as they are coming out.

    I have a large hive I could put them over. To nucs nested side by side???

    I also have a shop I can close them up and move them to during the worst of nights. Placing them back outside during the day.
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip...
    I have a large hive I could put them over. To nucs nested side by side???
    >either would be a good idea.
    another snip...
    I also have a shop I can close them up and move them to during the worst of nights. Placing them back outside during the day.
    >'inside' and then 'outside' maybe not the best of ideas... although you should be able either choice work but not both.

    >optimally you want to keep a hive as close to 43 degrees as possible when you 'cellar' bees and darkness is also for all practical purposes a requirement. although in most places shielding from excess cold winds may be a good idea (some places essential) temperatures even somewhat above 43 can present their own source of problem. for example in 'the shop idea' if you get one warm day when you forget to set the bees outside then likely you will return to find a lot of dead bee inside and outside the enclosure. people have kept bees in sheds before all that I have read about have a hive set on a stand up next to a southern facing wall with a permanent entrance built into the wall.
     
  10. timekeepsgoing

    timekeepsgoing New Member

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    We're starting to raise our own queens next season. We're very excited to start the process.
     
  11. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Isn't it amazing, how the bees, never having received any lessons on queen rearing, know just what to do. And if we don't mess them up, they do it right every time.:wink: