My first Split: a disaster so far.

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by pistolpete, May 11, 2013.

  1. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    This has been one of those terrible days that one has to write off as a "learning experience" I picked up a queen at noon today. So I went back home to make up a nuc to put her in. I could not find the queen, so I just picked five frames of mixed brood pollen and honey to and hoped for the best. Really finding an unmarked queen in 3 deeps full of bees has never been my forte. All this went well, but then the trouble started. It was very hot out, so I did not want the Nuc to overheat. I brought them in to the basement and went back to work. When I got home around 6, there were about a 100 bees bouncing off the windows and another 100 dead on the carpet. There was a little corner on the entrance screen that was loose and they squeezed out. So I caught all the live bees in a fish net and put them outside to find their way back to their home hive.

    As if that wasn't enough disaster for one day, I decided to mark my new queen. I'd practiced on a couple of drones, but I guess I was nervous with the queen. First she got away on me, bounced off the overhead light and fell to the floor. I gathered her up and went to put a dab of nail polish on her thorax. Too much got on there and ran down into the neck area. Chances are pretty good that queen is toast. Makes me quite sad that I fumbled so badly.

    The only bright side of the day is that the deep super I put on the hive 10 days ago already weighs around 60 pounds. The girls have been busy.

    In the morning I'll introduce the queen and cross my fingers that she makes it. I have another coming in two weeks if this operation fails.
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    We've all had days where things don't go quite how we had envisioned. It happens. At least you were willing to try to mark the queen, something I still haven't tried to do.
    I just recently made up some nucs, and on a couple of hives (one which was 3 deeps) it took two passes through the hive to locate the queens, both times she was in the first box I had gone through and missed. :roll:
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I have done the paint bobble thing myself pistolpete and although I refuse to sell something like that to a customer I don't really think it effects their performance beyond making them move oddly for a short while.

    this being you first nuc you perhaps can now see the value of having boxes to make up the nucs that are very very bee tight.
     
  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Some days just work out like that, but things will only get better with experience. Thanks for sharing, everybody can learn that way.

    With a hive that strong sounds like you could even make another split when your new queen arrives.
     
  5. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    Sorry to hear about your bad experience, but thanks for posting. When I mark a queen (and I'm sure that I will do this sometime in the future) I will purchase one of those queen marking tubes I saw in ML.
     
  6. mdunc

    mdunc New Member

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    I've been using this for marking my queens. Works well for me.
    [​IMG]