My first year.

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by heinleinfan, May 6, 2012.

  1. heinleinfan

    heinleinfan New Member

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    I wanted to share a few photo albums. If an admin thinks this post would be better suited in a different forum, let me know! These albums are from when I started keeping 4 years ago, and from a swarm capture, but I don't necessarily want to put them in 101, as I'm no expert! I don't want to say "Here's how to do this" but just share some bee pics with folks about "those early days". I enjoy looking back occasionally at my start, and reading my inexperience in my comments, (and sometimes reminding myself about my errors, heh) and thinking about how far I've come and how much keeping means to me now. I thought others might get a kick out of my pics, too.


    I was making these photo albums to share with friends and family far away who were not keepers, but who all wanted to know about this "crazy" thing my husband and I were doing. (Seriously, who keeps bees in their yard, that's crazy! teehee) So, the comments on pictures might seem...patronizing to an actual keeper, as they are simplified explanations about what's going on. Just wanted to explain the comments so as not to offend.

    Building Hive Frames (wired top bar frames with wired wax foundations)
    Installing a package
    Our first inspection
    Hiving a swarm (capturing a low hanging swarm into an empty hive box)
     
  2. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Thanks for sharing those pics. Those frames looked like hard work. I like using the N style frames from Kelleys that have a slot and allow a foundation to slide right in. How many hives are you up to now?
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    This forum is acceptable, but there is a BEE forum under The Photo Gallery if you want to keep all your picture posts together.
     
  4. heinleinfan

    heinleinfan New Member

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    Hi blueblood.
    The frames weren't so bad, but man those tiny nails are a pain. I've started using fishing line now instead of the wire for supports, and that speeds things up tremendously, no wire pressing needed.

    I have just two hives, no time, space or money for more than that currently. We also split one of our hives to populate our community garden beehive; it was a package starter last year that didn't survive the winter. It worked out well, we were able to split an "about to swarm" hive and saved the garden the money for a new package! That one is not solely ours; we are the primary care for it currently, and through the year will teach other garden members about it and any honey is shared amongst the garden.

    My husband and I do have a five-year plan to have an apiary of at least 20 hives, along with large garden, and chickens and goats and so forth, and are going to attempt to have an open "come and learn" type bed and breakfast setup, as well as community outreach and classes and tours, for small scale organic farming and beekeeping. *fingers crossed*
     
  5. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    When I get going a little more, I am going to consider the foundation with just a 1/5 of the wax provided. I have had foundation-less frames drawn out by them...they just do their natural thing!

    It is expensive, no doubt. I probably shouldn't have spent as much as I did but I but I sure am having fun! The swarms catches in the last month have saved me upwards of $300 I would have spent on nucs or packages.

    Wow, all you have to do then to be "off the grid" is to have a water source. Free range animals is the only way to go for health but not always easy to come by or affordable.