My garden

Discussion in 'General Gardening' started by Ladyleo191, Mar 17, 2013.

  1. Ladyleo191

    Ladyleo191 New Member

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    Well, yesterday I finally got the asparagus bed completely cleaned up and spread lime on it. If it doesn't rain today, I'll throw some compost on top of that and sit back and wait for those cute little spears.

    If I'm lucky, maybe the Magic Tractor Elf will come by one day while I'm at work and plow my garden spot. I spread some leaf litter on it yesterday and will compost and lime as I till.

    Still trying to decide what to plant, besides the usual tomatoes and green beans. Probably squash and okra...still not sure about cukes, got plenty of pickles left.

    Can't wait to get back in the dirt!
     
  2. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Me too, can't wait...especially since I did almost all my garden clean up already last Fall! :)
    I have a big pile of 2 yr old manure under a tarp that I will be wheelbarrowing in as I fork-dig each little section right before planting seeds or seedling. :Dancing: In 2 or 3 more weeks I'll be direct-seeding some spinach...
     

  3. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Well i jumped the gun, put out 2 rows potato's,1 row each of, radish, lettace, spinach, and 2 rows of texas sweet onions from Dixondale farms. Got enough onion plants for 10 more rows (my rows are 75 ft. long for my home garden), i sold alot of onions at the farmers market last year for $1.00 each, they weighed 1 lb. ea.:thumbsup:.Won't plant beets till around mid April,we had over 2" of rain last week and probably that much last night? water is standing in the fields this mourning.Our last frost date is May 10th, so it will be awhile before i plant the main garden.Jack
     
  4. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    Nothing planted yet, but it's tilled up some.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Wish i had that loader to pull my onoins and radishes out of the ground.:thumbsup: While were talking gardening, Perry's probably thinking how much snow he could move with that loader:lol:. Greg, is that a blackberry or raspberry patch in the picture? Jack
     
  6. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    Actually, that is just the garden. I have a 4' chicken wire fence around it to keep the rabbits and ground hogs out. There's weeds and vines grown up on it that I need to cut down. I do have a few blackberry vines, but they're off to the left of the garden. I've got to build some box-trellis things for them this year, too. I'll be glad for a few days off with good weather.
     
  7. Minz

    Minz Member

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    Been struggling with the gardening this year. Still doing it according to the calendar but it is simply ‘forced’. I got peas, radish, kohlrabi, and some beets in the ground. I need to divert the rain gutters to the bucket and hook up my drip hoses, move the cold frame into place for some peas. I got my peppers and tomato’s started in the house. Maybe this will bring some moderation to my gardening season.
     
  8. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    oops...we are supposed to get 3-7 inches of snow tonight. No spinach planting just yet. lol
     
  9. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    The only thing we have in the ground is Frost! You'd need a jackhammer to plant. Actually I do have the garlic I planted in November growing under the snow. IMG_0663.JPG Eventually we will get some green again
     
  10. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I'm right with you Greg, I turned mine over and ran the tiller through it twice on Saturday.
     
  11. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I put my spinach and swiss chard in back in november. Started broccoli then too, but the hard freeze nailed it, it came up first. Replanted the broccoli, it's about 2 inches tall now, not sure I'm going to get any heads on it. I have onions in that I started in November too.

    Started tomatoes and peppers in the greenhouse on Saturday. Should have done it 2 weeks before but I was working and tired. I will direct seed my zucchini and crookneck squash after this next cold snap, or during it. In Texas we plant by the rain... Rain germinates plants better.

    Does lime help asparagus? because I've got my bed to 3 years with not much more than some compost for amenities, and I'm getting a few spears. (didn't help that we had no rain and hard freezes the first winter, only the toughest roots even lived.) My water has a pH of about 8, fair amount of lime in it, so I have never added any. I do crumble some eggshells on stuff that needs calcium though.
     
  12. LunacyMountain

    LunacyMountain New Member

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    DONT TILL your ground people tilling damages all the micro organisms and fungi mycelium that have been trying to develop since the last time you tilled...build raised beds out of straw or leaf mulch and feed it every year and it will slowly break down into more soil...soil is ALIVE feed your soil not your plants and you will have good ground to grow in for years and years with very little to NO crop rotation needed tilling is a waste of time and energy that people just think they need to do....save your back, save your gas, save your soil....every year your raised beds will season with more and more micro organisms and fungi mycelium, and your plants will thrive more and more with less and less compost and manure needed....
     
  13. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    LM, what is this based on? not to argue with the above statements, but it seems to go against what i've learned and done all my life? Some plants like tomato's,(for one) if you don't rotate every two years will become less productive, get the wilt and other diseases that build in the soil. Some micro organisms and fungi can live in the soil for years, and from what i've been taught that by tilling to irrigate the soil and expose harmful organisms to sunlight to kill them and stemulate root growth? Jack
     
  14. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I have a spade. I use it when it feels right.
     
  15. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    I deep-dig my beds with a big long fork just before planting. And I avoid walking on the beds and compacting them. That way my carrots grow straight, for one thing. My soil has been getting better every year. I use no mulch, but i do add a little compost and manure occasionally. Now I can't even lift a spadeful more than a couple times before finding thriving earthworms. Earthworms are a healthy soil sign, and they bring additional nutrients up from many feet below the surface.
    Doing well with my garden fork, thanks! :)
     
  16. LunacyMountain

    LunacyMountain New Member

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    I understand the no till method is hard to understand because of the monoculture system we live in has been doing this for hundreds and hundreds of years but the research shows that permaculture techniques feed and create the soil that will be viable and good to grow in for not only you but your kids....and yes some crop rotation is needed at times but instead of rotating crops its better to plant a herb or flower or legume that feeds the soil the nutrients that the plant eating them needs....we develop food forest where each plant is feeding nutrients or retaining water for it's neighboring plants and hand choose herbs that repel pest and bring in predator bugs...plant some fast growing legumes next to your veggies and fruit so that they can feed nitrogen to the soil and you can chop and drop them as they grow to compost where they lay and feed the soil again....we do about 2 weeks of research for about every day of labor here and produce TONS literally TONS of weight off of about each 1/10 of an acre..... I've spent the last 5 years researching Fungi, and soil development, permaculture designs....if anyone is interested in this way of gardening I will be happy to point you in the direction of knowledge so you can be self sufficient for not only you but your entire family off very little land....
     
  17. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    lunacy, we do some raised garden beds, it works, we also rotate like jack mentioned, especially for the potatoes. mr river uses a broad fork, but our gardens are huge, and we do till some areas.
     
  18. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    You want to hear real lunacy??

    I have a garden about 6 feet wide and 15 feet long. I have 7 tractors. After canning over 100 jars of veggies each year and freezing more, my wife has said "No garden this year". Our family has dwindled down to 2, but we kept putting it away like when it was 5. I guess it's time to slow down a bit.
     
  19. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I have North Texas clay. maybe in a few years my fork will be usable in most of my garden beds, but for now, forks are expensive, the tines bend. I use it to move and turn compost.
     
  20. Ladyleo191

    Ladyleo191 New Member

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    Gypsi, around here, we have to lime just about everything because our clay soil is so acidic. I had my soil tested last year and it needed lime badly. Some of the mulch includes pine needles, and while the jury is still out on whether pine needles increase soil acidity, I usually lime when I start playing in the ground.

    LM, I would love to have no-till raised beds, but it would take maybe 2, 3, 4 years for straw and compost to have the depth of amended soil needed for me to plant and I need to eat this winter. I don't have the space to put in beds in a separate area and wait while I amend the soil for the next couple of years, so for now, I still have a 'garden spot' and till and hoe, just like my family before me.

    To the Tractor Elf...Thank you!