My garden

Discussion in 'General Gardening' started by Ladyleo191, Mar 17, 2013.

  1. LunacyMountain

    LunacyMountain New Member

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    pine needles are defiantly Acidic I use them as mulch to change the color of certain flowers without adding chemicals to change the ground PH...

    we have massively dense red clay that is full of quartz rock here...but what a lot people don't know is clay is full of minerals and is great to grow in....if it just wasn't so dense....but raising beds for massive root balls to develop in, then they tap into the highly wet and nutritious clay underneath gives me massive 15ft tall okra plants and trellised tomato plants that grow as big and wide as I want, last year we had them going up ten foot poles then back down to the ground, cucumbers that do about twice as much as the tomatoes, a variety of squash that try to compete with the cucumbers.....sweet pepper plants that rock 30+ peppers each, hot pepper plants that get 100-150+ peppers each except for some varieties that just stay small but pack mighty powerful peppers. I could go on and on but we grow about 60 varieties of veg not including greens, herbs, and edible flowers....

    and we defiantly don't wait for the beds to be composted...they just get better each year is all, our new beds that we make and plant in that year are made of fresh straw, I only put compost/dirt mix in each plant spot.... the biggest problem we face is supporting our massive plants and keeping them from toppling over lol....but when you can't afford lumber or gas for your chainsaw just grow some sunflowers or corn and grow your veg right up them
     
  2. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Gardeners are a dying breed, but I've been contagious at it since about 1985, when all I planted was cantaloupes. I can't quite feed myself from my 1/3 acre plot, for some reason white potatoes don't do well, (winter crop here) but sweet potatoes do. I also raise chicken and am going to try some aquaponics with tilapia and greens grown in their water filter this summer. I mainly buy oatmeal, chicken feed and a little meat. I now have a milk goat, her kid is due first week of may. We'll see how that works out.
     

  3. Ladyleo191

    Ladyleo191 New Member

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    LM, I have one raised bed for my asparagus, and when we filled it....it happened to rain that night. I was working night shifts, so by the time I got back to it 2 days later, I had an 8X4ft brick in my backyard, LOL.

    Since I'm getting a bit older, I'd love to try beds, and it may be a project for me this winter if I can find a corner.

    I hope you look those quartz rocks over good when you see them, my part of NC has gold and gold is usually found with quartz around here. (but that's off topic...another time and place)
     
  4. LunacyMountain

    LunacyMountain New Member

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    hehe yeah gold is in abundance here, I don't do any mining but while digging up quartz boulders for landscape use I sometimes find rather sellable chunks attached to the rocks....just another reward from mother nature for what I call "doing right by the land"

    with the right amount of planning you can feed more than yourself from a 1/3 acre plot....

    aquaponics can be an amazing system if used with the right gardening techniques, defiantly one of the most productive methods of fertilizer production

    Dairy Goats!!! oh man we love our nanny's plus once you get into milk production you can start making Chevre and Feta, oooh and Gouda!!!! not to mention goat milks soap to add to your inventory

    we use chicken tractors here, a coop on wheels...great to put goats on an area for awhile then move then out and roll your chicken coop on top of the area then once it's scratched and double fertilized ready to build raised beds on....

    here in NC Will Hooker shares an entire semester of permaculture classes for free on the internet b/c he thinks the knowledge should be available to EVERYONE, really long (an entire semester) but if you want to transition into permaculture from the ridiculously unproductive and land destroying methods of monoculture farming I'd say this is your first stop

    http://mediasite.online.ncsu.edu/online/Play/a2e6edb63ab4478d831a0f8a026a2a641d

    leading permaculture designers like Geoff Lawton also have tons of videos and information you can obtain to further your research. this guy develops lush food forest in the middle of deserts...he ran the Australian Permaculture Institute

    one of the founders of permaculture design Bill Mollison also has tons of content you can obtain, he farms almost year round at the top of the Alps mountain range....fruit, citrus, corn, you name it...this guy proves that you can grow anything anywhere in abundance