my insecticide problem/requeening

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by kugoggio, Jun 15, 2009.

  1. kugoggio

    kugoggio New Member

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    One of my hives, it would seem (through all the research & questions I've asked) had found an insecticide tainted source about 2 weeks ago. I lost about 1000 bees, but for a week now the dieing ended, all seems well.
    Upon inspection today I noticed what looks to me like 4-5 queen cells that have hatched. There are about 7 out of 9 frames in the bottom box that have a fair amount of capped brood, there is some larvae and some (not a lot) of new eggs. I kept the second brood box on the entire time of the die-off, it was 4-5 days after I added this box that the die-off started. I kept it on so not to disturb the work they started, though it wasn't a lot, but before the die-off they bottom box was completely drawn. Now, nearly 3 weeks from when I put the second brood box they have virtually done nothing in it yet. Is this because they are "rebuiliding" from the bottom up again due to the die-off?
    If what I"m seeing is a re-queened hive is there something I should watching for to see if she's of quality? Could the re-queening be a result from the insecticide issue?
    In the early part of the die-off I put out some sugar water for them, seems like they're not taking it though, seems like whats gone could be a result of evaporation. Left on too long can it go bad?
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    A hive whose foragers are gone is not bringing anything in to store, so don't need to make storage comb at this time. When the forage force has been rebuilt, they will draw comb, if there's still a flow going on. The requeening could very well be from the pesticide. The sugar water should still be fine when they have foragers to carry it into the hive.
     

  3. kugoggio

    kugoggio New Member

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    Thanks Iddee.

    Is there something I should be keeping an eye on with the quality of the "maybe' new queen? What will tell me if they're going to get though this drawback?
    Thanks again.
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    A solid brood pattern is a good queen. A shotgun pattern isn't. In other words, when they cap the brood, the fewer empty cells, the better the queen.