Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
My mentor has had 5 swarms, he has sited poor weather as the reason he has not worked them.
Maybe he is getting tired.
Get out there and pop some lids! If it's not pouring rain and blowing sideways, get in there and have a look.

I have blundered through the winter with a hands off attitude, and I'm still not sure this one is queenright.
No more of that, I'm not going to get a good buildup with this late of a start. They will get queen right or I WILL combine them soon.
I've already given them 2 small swarms and a frame of brood, but Im not sure there was a queen in the last swarm and the colony was definitely queenless prior to the last.

You need to relax and stay calm while working the bees, it should be a Zen moment become one with the bees.
Plan what you have to do and go through the motions if you have to, to check the work flow and space.
I made a tote with everything (almost it's getting too heavy!) in it.
Water spray
Sugar spray
6 different hive tools
Smoker & lighter
medium and long cake knife & filet knife
screwdriver & 5in1 tool
Bee brush
bee ailments brochure
Queen catchers & rubber bands
HoneyBGone
Lemongrass oil
Spatula long handle
gloves to keep the propolis off
small spirit level
Frame grabber
Frame hanger
Super bright flashlight
Rolled up piece of heavy canvas

This keeps me from running around looking for stuff, or taking shortcuts because I don't have something handy.

The rest is planning, have all your gear ready fill the smoker and get it lit as you mentally go through your moves.
Have plan B ready or at least near and be thinking about plan C, that way when things go wonky you are better prepared.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Wil

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
A split should take the swarm right out of them. Re-Queening should get you some different genetics, maybe less swarmy?
I'm not saying your bees are swarmy! However it is said this can be a genetic trait. Not sure how well that is anchored in fact.
Leave the freshest brood in the hive and pull the queen and a frame of emerging brood and start another colony putting it in the original location.
Foragers will return to the original location to fortify/feed the single frame and queen.
The old hive will make a new queen from the fresh eggs. (downside is 50 days til you get new babies, IF your new queen returns mated)
If she doesn't return, or if you squash the queen cells you can recombine after a week or 3 (bonus is a brood break).
Recombining would be best for your honey crop, a split will likely slow honey production. (1 large colony will make more honey than 2 small)
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top