My Winter Strategy

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Ed_C, May 1, 2014.

  1. Ed_C

    Ed_C New Member

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    Very cold winter for us this year. One January night I went out and put an ear to the hives. I can normally hear them buzzing. I heard nothing. The next day I listened with a stethoscope, again nothing. I carried my two dead and very light hives into the garage for safekeeping and to prevent mold. The next day I opened them up and found they were actually alive but essentially out of honey. I immediately made some candy board and placed it where the feeder can would go.

    For the rest of the winter I checked the candy every few days and added more when it was gone. On a few warmer days I had a few bees flying around the garage but no big deal. I concluded they need to see light from the doorway to come out and the garage was always dark. I also noticed that the inside of the top cover tended to be dripping wet from condensation. I previously kept a piece of Styrofoam on top over the winter assuming it would prevent this. Sure enough, I put the Styrofoam back on top and the condensation was all but eliminated. I lucked out and saved my hives and the cost of more bees this year. I'll bring them in every year from now on.
     
  2. DMLinton

    DMLinton New Member

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    Excellent idea, Ed_C. My first bees will be here in a month, or so, and when winter comes, they will be somewhere that I, not Mother Nature, control the climate. An upside of this option, as you found, is that you can lift the lid if you need to have a look at how things are going.
     

  3. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    But remember that the hive needs light stimulation to trigger them to start laying brood.