Naval Jelly for cleaning extractor basket rust?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by DCoates, Feb 18, 2011.

  1. DCoates

    DCoates New Member

    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm rebuilding a 20 frame extractor from Dadant that was built in '79. It has 5 collars that the stainless steel basket is welded to, 2 high 3 low and they are tightened on a stainless steel shaft with allen screws. Here's the weird part, they appear to be regular steel. They rusted such that I stripped one of the bottom allens so I can't get it off. I can't drill it out as it's too close the the basket and I can't get anything in there.

    I've got the Camcote to seal it once I get it clean but how do I get it clean? I'm considering sand blasting it but that will only get the exposed areas whereas Naval Jelly might work better for my challenges. I'd really appreciate any feedback from anyone with any experience in this arena.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

    Messages:
    3,276
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Harbor freight has an inexpensive off set drill that might work,looks like a ratchet. Jack
     

  3. Murrell

    Murrell New Member

    Messages:
    382
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If I remember correctly you work for a manufacturing co.
    You might talk to the maintance mechanic. he probably has a 90 degree drill or knows who has one you can borrow.

    I had a 90 degree air drill but sent most all my tools to my grandson in Arizona.

    Murrell
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    reverse electrolysis--heres a link--

    http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php/topic,19714.0.html

    I clean my cast iron pots that way. It removes all rust and leaves them like new.

    If you can get a dremel tool in there, you can slot the screw and use a screwdriver to get it out
     
  5. DCoates

    DCoates New Member

    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Murrel,

    I do, and I tried that earlier, but we've got no 90 degree drill.

    Update, I decided to attack the main stripped out Allen screw at a nasty angle. It was not pretty but apparently the vibration broke something loose. The screw was destroyed but the collar and it's threading is indamaged. This blind squrrel found a nut! Once I got that one out I tried it on the other two and after an hour or so success! So I thought... They had rusted something fierce on the stainless shaft. After quite a bit of hammering, vice work, and a cut that almost required stitches I was able to twist them off without damaging the shaft. Considering there are two welded collars on both the top and bottom of the basket there's rust that I can't get to between there. Electrolysis won't let me get in there to clean out the black stuff between the collars before I camcoat it. I'm thinking I might use Ospho for the space between the collars otherwise the camcoat will no be able to stop the rust from eventually bleeding back though. Thoughts?
     
  6. Murrell

    Murrell New Member

    Messages:
    382
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Here's what I think for what it's worth.

    This is a extractor not a storage tank for honey, the honey is slung from the basket, you might say instantly.

    What honey should touch a minute amount of rust would only be a couple of drops, spread over it till washing time.

    Remember the galvanized honey equiptment, Maxant [sp] said it was made into the 1980's, and some still being used.

    Murrell

    Ok. I Know, go to the back of the bus again.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    my two denaro..

    with Allen Screws I find that some are British/US sized and some are metric. using the inappropriate wrench is extremely risky.

    stainless steel.... some folks seem to think that stainless will not rust. if you brush (or perhaps even clean) stainless with an non appropriate cleaning item like a plain wire brush or a brillo pap this will quite quickly lead to surface rusting. Even using a stainless steel brush that has previously been used on common steel will lead to the exactly the same results. 3-M makes a 'scrubbing type pad' made especially for shining and cleaning stainless steel.

    here such items as stainless steel set screws and shaft collars would be easily replaceable at one of three bolt and nut (fasteners) stores.
     
  8. rast

    rast New Member

    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Listen to IDDEE and Tec., at least for future reference. Reverse electrolysis works great, I've used it for years with a 3 amp battery charger.
    If you strip out a std size allen, try a metric size and vice versa. Being in the marine business all my life, there are many different grades of stainless and many ways to make it rust.

    Edit- after going and reading IDDEE's link you'll find me in it. I told ya "years".
     
  9. DCoates

    DCoates New Member

    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Murrell,

    I'm with you and normally that stuff doesn't bother me at all. However, as this extractor sat quiet for a decade, mice moved in under the belt guard. Their "calling cards" were everywhere up there. I believe the salt of their calling cards (liquid version) ran down the shaft and caused the rust on the collars. There are big flat backplates above the collars where they appeared to camp out as well. Those collars are pitted such that salt or fertilizer (or both) had to be involved. With that said, I really want to make sure this thing is so clean I could operate on it before I start using it.