Need a topic

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Bens-Bees, Jun 24, 2010.

  1. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    My local association asked me to write a short article for their next newsletter... but I've had writers block for the past few weeks... I just can't seem to come up with a topic. If I could come up with a topic to write about, then I'm sure I wouldn't have trouble actually writing... but I need help coming up with a topic that's relevant to this time of year... any ideas?
     
  2. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

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    Do folks in your association sell honey to stores? At Farm Mkts? Where? Or do they just give it away?

    I am all about product pride and selling honey, the product of the hive.

    Why don't you write on that? Maybe call or go see a cpl of prominent club members and ask them about selling honey. Feature them in your article as examples of selling honey. What they do and how they do it.

    That aught to fill up a page or two.
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Cutouts are always attention getters.
     
  4. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    do a paper on the different resources on the internet for bee keepers to learn and share ideas. Computers have just about replaced books for learning. Put a good word in for beekeepingforums.com :drinks:
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    or the resurgence of hobby beekeeping. the dadant fellow from Paris (that's Paris, Texas and not Paris France) said he suspected the numbers had quadrupled in the past few years.
     
  6. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    I went ahead and wrote about the last cutout I did... or rather, all the mistakes I made. I had no shortage of material to work with there... LOL
     
  7. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I just read your article, sounds like you had a fun day for sure............lessons learned................I hope :lol:
     
  8. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    A PAPER??? I could write a 20 volume set of books on what I shouldn't have done on a cutout....
     
  9. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    It was just a short article for our county club newsletter

    https://docs.google.com/a/tds.net/viewe ... Source=SSO

    That is Ben on page 13 top right..............the little fella :shock:
    He is a super nice guy, first time I ever met him he had a swarm he had caught and no where to put it, so he gave it to me. It was still in his bee vac.
     
  10. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    It won't let me in without a user name and password.
     
  11. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Well I don't know how to copy it over to here or unlock the link. I tried a couple of different things.
     
  12. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    There I finally got part of it figured out, no pics though, sorry

    SIX HARD EARNED LESSONS FROM A CUTOUT By Benjamin Volk I recently did a cutout; it wasn’t my first, but I made so many mistakes that itmight as well have been my first. I got the call on a Wednesday afternoon; the gentlemanon the other end of the phone gave a familiar story, he had bees in the side of an oldabandoned house on his property. He didn’t know how long they had been there but theyhad never been a problem until recently when one stung his son while he was mowing thelawn near the hive. He then said that when his son got stung his son grabbed a can ofRaid wasp and hornet killer and had started to spray the hive when his father stoppedhim. But he said it had been a few days since then and the bees seemed to have survived.To compound matters however, the bees were behind asbestos siding. Any sanebeekeeper would have hung up the phone at this point… but I’ve never been accused ofbeing sane; so thinking it would be a complete waste of time I reluctantly agreed to take alook at the situation and at least advise him on the best course of action to take with them.Upon looking at the situation and seeing that the bees looked pretty healthy, nobig piles of dead bees by the entrance or anything, plus I have a good quality respirator,so I decided to go ahead and do the cutout. I scheduled the cutout for Sunday, theSunday that was father’s day. Since it was father’s day I knew my wife couldn’t objectto it since she knows that getting into bees is what I love doing. So I started off early inthe day, I figured I’d expose the hive before it got too hot, vacuum out the bees mid-morning, then remove the comb in the early afternoon. Here are the hard lessons Ilearned from this cutout:Lesson #1: If you start on the cutout first thing in the morning before the foragers haveleft, there are many, MANY more bees left to guard the hive. That’s fine for small hives,but when I opened this one up I quickly discovered that it was at least twice the size ofany other hive I’ve dealt with. So while this strategy for doing cutouts has worked for mein the past, this time I started getting stung before I had even finished exposing the hive.Lesson #2: Tuck your pants into your socks. I was quite surprised at how quickly thebees found that they could crawl right up my pant legs. I’ve never tucked my pants in tomy socks before and it’s never been a problem; however, if this only happens one time,let me be the first to tell you, that is one too many.Lesson #3: Don’t forget to bring extra smoker fuel. It turns out that the bigger the hive,the longer a cutout takes (who knew?). I brought more than enough smoker fuel for thetime I gauged the job would take, but it turns out that was about half the time the jobactually took. I don’t know exactly how many times I got stung; I stopped counting at 2dozen.Lesson #4: Bring at least 3 times the amount of hive boxes and buckets as you thinkyou’ll need. This had to be the biggest error I made. I didn’t bring enough hive boxes orbuckets. I had only gotten about halfway done vacuuming up the bees when I realizedthat my bee-vac with the single hive body on it wouldn’t hold anywhere near all the beesI needed it to. That meant that I had to swap it out mid-job. This might not have been abig deal if I had gotten the queen in there already, but I hadn’t yet come across her and Ididn’t “prime†the vac hive with brood from another hive, so there was no reason for thebees to stay in the hive. Naturally when I swapped out the box on the bee-vac the bees in
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    the first box quickly vacated the box. I was just lucky that they were all too sticky to flyfrom honey that had coated nearly everything by that point. So they clustered on theoutside of the hive until I was done with the rest of the job, but then I had to brush themback into a hive box, which just made a long job, that much longer.Lesson #5: Bring water. Being that this was an old abandoned house, it had noelectricity or water on tap. With small jobs, the stickiness is bearable until you can getback to a faucet or spigot to clean up. But with a large job, the stickiness becomesexponentially more difficult to deal with. Bringing a bucket of water and a rag wouldhave been a big help.Lesson #6: Don’t forget to bring lids for your comb buckets, especially when you drive acar. Out of all the other mistakes I made, nothing made me feel like quite such a rookieas this boneheaded maneuver. By the time I was finished with the cutout, I had no choicebut to let the bees ride shotgun with me. I had a net for the hive boxes, but not thebuckets. So when I finally finished the job in the late afternoon of a 92 degree day, Icouldn’t even take off my bee suit. I had to wear it all the way home. Furthermore therewere so many bees in the car that I got stung at least another half dozen times on the wayhome.As bad as all that sounds, I had an absolute ball anyway. Furthermore I wenthome with a new hive of bees and a little change in my pocket. So even though I made aton of mistakes that led to getting stung much more than I should have, I’ll stick by theold adage that sys “the worst day of beekeeping still beats the best day in an officecubicle.â€
     
  13. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    I really wish I had a working camera that day... would have made for some great pics.