Need Advice on what to do next

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by turoki, Apr 29, 2010.

  1. turoki

    turoki New Member

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    Hi first of i would like to say i am not a bee keeper and i dont claim to be one, but im really want to start and learn what ever i can, with that said i would really appreciate some advice,
    About a month back we started to see swarms flying around my house i think it is due to all the fruit trees we have, well anyways a descent size swarm decided to start to make a hive in my mothers rose bushes after a few days of them not leaving i decided they needed a new home so i put out a wooden box that i had and they adopted it as there home they have been living there for a while now and started to make comb 's. this is where i need the advice i really would like to keep them and would like to give them a better home i was thinking of building them a top bar hive that i managed to get the plans for but i dont have a clue as how to move them from one hive to another. i would really like to make them happy and give them a better home but i dont know if i should or if should leave them in the old box or would it be ok to move them? any help is appreciated thanks

    here are some pictures of what they look like right now
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  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    given your location have you had the swarm/hive tested for africanization?

    it is hard to get any idea of cell size, but notice how straight those slabs of comb are....

    moving feral hives to movable frames is subject to a high level of loss. on the other hand in most states keeping bees in non removable frames is illegal.
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Yes, you can move them. It is quite a job to do so, tho. I suggest you search for cutouts and removals. Read some of the articles there, then try to find a local beekeeper who will assist you with it. By then, if they are Africanized, they should be showing traits.

    PS. Wear protective gear and use smoke. Even if they aren't Africanized now, they may become so after a supercedure, swarm, or usurpation.

    Welcome to the forum.
     
  4. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Wow, those look great!
    Just my personal opinion, but if you've been holding those combs up with your gloved hands and observing/opening the bees several times already without being aggressively attacked, I'd not worry about them being Africanized bees until they gave me a good reason to decide otherwise. That swarm may well have come from some other guy's hive a few miles away.

    If you get 2 hive bodies that are DEEPS (say ones that are designed to hold 8 frames per box- easier to lift than 10 frame setups) and put together some deep wooden frames without foundation, you could take cut off the large pieces of the comb, trim to fit, and secure them into the frames with some sturdy large rubber bands. If the bees like their new digs, they will quickly attach the comb pieces to the wood frames and they'll get rid of the rubber bands for you too, once they are satisfied. If you use these as the brood chamber(s) you won't need to extract the honey from those frames anyway. Once the comb ages it becomes less delicate and breakable. Then once they fill the one or two deep brood boxes, you can add on top a honey super or two with regular frames (with foundation in them), for honey extraction purposes.
    If you don't want to go to all this trouble, I'm sure there would be other local beekeepers who would be delighted to adopt that colony you've got there. :)

    Just sayin' what I myself would do- everyone does differently.