Need help requeening

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by paint504, Jun 21, 2015.

  1. paint504

    paint504 Member

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    ImageUploadedByBeekeeping Forum1434933788.515173.jpg ImageUploadedByBeekeeping Forum1434933848.244802.jpg ok so I found emergency cells the other day and confirmed that the queen was in fact missing. Now do I cut the queen cells out before sticking my new queen in there or should I just leave them alone?
     
  2. paint504

    paint504 Member

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    The hive is a little over 3 weeks old not sure what happened to the queen.
     

  3. JosephCarboni

    JosephCarboni New Member

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    Thus is my first year beek. I was told in the same situation to cut them out an before you try an place a new queen in.
     
  4. JosephCarboni

    JosephCarboni New Member

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    An I was also told in my other hive not to put a new queen an let nature take its course both cases have worked well for me
     
  5. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I agree with Joseph, I would let them hatch their own queen for now.
     
  6. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    I am assuming you are a new keeper. The safest option would be to leave the hive alone to raise their own new queen. You might want to leave the hive alone for 3 to 4 weeks for the new queen to emerge, get mated and start layng. It can take several weeks for a new queen to start laying. Checking the hive frequently will upset the colony and it can take a few days for a hive to settle down after a visit.

    Culling the Q cells and introducing a new Q now has the advantage of new brood being started sooner. A drawback would be if the new Q is not accepted. You would then be back to square one with less options.
     
  7. ibeelearning

    ibeelearning Member

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    My vote: Assuming you are not under time pressure from mid season dearth or decline, stick as close to nature as possible, your Q cells are already made. If you are lucky: < 2 weeks to hatch, another few days to mate and start laying.

    If you are standing there with a bought Q in your hand, try to make a small split.
     
  8. paint504

    paint504 Member

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    I'd rather let nature take it's course but my only concern was that this hive is 3 weeks old and I'm concerned about the bees dieing off before the new queen has a chance to replenish.
     
  9. paint504

    paint504 Member

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    What's your thoughts on that?
     
  10. JosephCarboni

    JosephCarboni New Member

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    I have five hives now my first two I started on new equipment with 1 frame of drown comb each they were packages of bees an two queens. Just as they started to lay they either killed the queens or I did the first week in. I checked both hives the second week an found in hive 2 (12) capped queen cells . I was told to take one frame that had some of the queen cells an put it into hive 1. So I did that didn't mess with them other than feeding them for about 16 days. When I took a look 16 days later with a guy from my bee club we found both hives had new queens eggs an larva. They were a little week but survived well. Now they are booming. Hope this helps you
     
  11. paint504

    paint504 Member

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    Well I thank you guys for your responses. I think I'll just wait 3 weeks and see what happens. The old queen did lay some eggs before she died so I'm hoping that will help.
     
  12. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I have noticed that nucs occasionally requeen themselves early, not sure why. Maybe the queen is injured in moving?
     
  13. paint504

    paint504 Member

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    Mine were package bees. Not sure what happened to the queen she was laying very nicely and then Vanished like a fart in the wind.
     
  14. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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