New"bee" from Ontario/Canada

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by SuiGeneris, Aug 29, 2017.

  1. SuiGeneris

    SuiGeneris New Member

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    Hello, I'm a very new to the beekeeping game (as in, I'm starting my first hives next spring...still in dreaming/planning mode). I've frequented this forum a number of times in my research and decided to join so I can ask questions directly. Looking forward to getting advice from the group!

    In my other hobby "lives" I'm a hobby farmer and a life-long home brewer. My hope is to use the honey from the hives, yeasts harvested locally, and fruits/spices from around my property for making mead...sortof the ultimate "local" brew.
     
  2. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    welcome aboard... have you tried to grow your own hopps for brewing?
     

  3. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I make a little mead now and then, but a little leary of wild yeasts for now. welcome
     
  4. SuiGeneris

    SuiGeneris New Member

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    @roadkillbobb, yes, I have grown my own hops. Unfortunately I had to give them away when we moved this year, but I have already started prepping an area at our new property to plant in the spring. I'm excited about it - there were a lot of flaws in my old trellis system, so I've got a chance to reset and do it right this time around.

    @Gypsi, I am a microbiologist by profession, and brew a lot with wild yeasts, so it more-or-less my wheelhouse. While OT for the forum, I've got a lot of articles on my blog (link in my signature) about how to use wild yeast if you ever want to go that route.
     
  5. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    cool, I know my state, NY has a good amount of grant money to give out to people that come up with a plan to grow hops, when I get more time I want to look more into that and see if its worth the time to get into that..the biggest issue is harvest time, the machinery to pick and separate the cones and then to dry and process is expensive, so I also have to see what services or companies there are that could do that for the grower, or just buy the vines with the cones....
     
  6. SuiGeneris

    SuiGeneris New Member

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    We looked briefly into growing commercially (we've got a similar climate to you); ultimately, the start-up costs sunk that idea as the cost of planting is extreme ($50K/acre or thereabouts), and that doesn't include the cost of the machinery you need for harvest. There isn't a lot of hop growing around here, so there are no pay-fpr-service harvesters/processors...if there was I think we'd have taken the plunge.

    B
     
  7. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    the start up costs are big and you have to wait 3 years for payback as it takes 3 years for the vines to be in full production, my state of NY says they are about 500 acres short of hops, as all the micro breweries that want to call themselves NY beer must use a certain % of hops grown in NY..from what I here all the hops grown here is sold even before it grows as its in such demand, and thats why the state has lots of grants for it ...the state estimate for net profit at top of production is about 15k an acre, so depending what grant $$ you get payback is not that long as long as all goes well...but that price is also processing the hops ready to use for beer..
     
  8. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    wow hops sounds like a booming crop
     
  9. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    it is if you have the time to wait for payback, its a bit of an investment..thats why many farmers dont grow it, as they dont have the capital to put up and have to wait so long to get some money back...
     
  10. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    at the moment I don't have the land, but if I could afford the land it is something to consider.