New Bee Keeper on NY/Vt Border

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by jcb500, May 30, 2012.

  1. jcb500

    jcb500 New Member

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    HI,

    I'm glad I found you folks, I've been floundering w/ a very healthy hive now for about 3 years.
    Hive swarmed 2x last year and 2x year before. I'm on NY Vermont border 30 miles north east of
    Albany, about the same distance from Bennington, in Valley Falls NY. I am a trained Classical
    Gourmet Chef, and an avid Motorcyclist, classic machines are my favorite.

    The hive is on a Native Woodland Plant Rescue Nursery, so the honey has a wonderful flavor.
    I have the Better Bee bee Max hive w/ 3 supers about to be 4 today, the hive is very strong. I would like
    to start another hive, ( I have the equipment), I have some crazy ideas on how to so this, but would
    like some expert assistance and or guidance.

    Last year I tried to start another hive but it didn't work. I got a new queen and took 4 frames from the established
    hive and placed it in another hive box, and by the end of 5 days, the strong hive 86'ed the new queen and took all
    they could off the frames and back into the established hive.

    Thank you

    Joe Piska*Valley Falls*NY*SUA
     
  2. dr.buzz

    dr.buzz New Member

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    The strong hive killed the new queen? What did you do with the old queen? I don't buy queens since bees make their own so easily, but still, I feel safe saying I would have expected you to want to start your 4 frame nuc with the new queen and let the donor colony keep their old queen.

    Or maybe you mean that you did start your nuc with the new queen, but the strong hive robbed out the nuc, killing the new queen in the process?

    You'll get plenty of help here on what to do, and if you give more info on what exactly you did, you can get some correction on what you did wrong, if you want (and maybe even if you don't want :))

    If you want honey this year, you might not want to split them until after the flow is over. If you split after the flow, you'll need to feed them to help build them back up. You have lots of options. You can take your existing queen and a few frames of capped brood and stores and start a new colony, leaving eggs/larvae in the strong colony to raise a new queen....You can do a 50/50 divide, like if you don't want to locate the queen or whatever, just take your top brood box (assuming that you have 2 brood boxes) and set it down next to the bottom one, making sure that both boxes have eggs/larvae in them, so whoever doesn't have a queen will raise one, etc...

    Just make sure if you start a weak hive and are feeding it, reduce the entrance to reduce robbing.

    Welcome to the board, you'll get plenty of help here.
     

  3. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    Welcome jcb500 to the friendliest bee forum around. :hi: There are a bunch of knowledgable folks here willing to share.
    Look around some of the threads that have been posted on how to do a split.
    Last year, did you immediately release the queen from her queen cage? If so, that's why they killed her. You should leave her in the cage for at least 3 days before releasing her into the hive. This gives the workers a chance to get used to her smell and accept her.
    Again, welcome and good luck.
     
  4. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    Welcome jcb you found A friendly forum.Grouches are banished to the dungen and put on the rack.
     
  5. jcb500

    jcb500 New Member

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    OK, I think I understand, I had a head injury a few years ago, so sometimes it's hard to understand what I ask.
    Advanced thanks for patience.

    OK Now, I have two brood boxes on the healty hive, but the bottom box is very light, not a lot of brood and or weight.

    so I could take that "light" brood box with the queen, and place it on the ground, supported of course, and allow the bees to move into the empty boxes.?How far away should the new hive be from the strong hive...and just allow old hive to grow a new Queen?

    Joe
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Set the box with the queen and light stores on another bottom board and give it a lid. Reduce the entrance to about 1 inch. Go through the upper deep and MAKE SURE there are eggs in it. If you can't see eggs, get help.

    Move the new hive with queen 10 feet or more away from the original location and add one super of honey to it from the old hive.

    Check the old hive in 6 to 10 days for capped queen cells. If they are found, leave it quiet without disturbance until 28 days after the split. Then check it for eggs and larva.
     
  7. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Hi Joe

    I would like to add my warm welcome along with the others who already have. You have indeed found a friendly place to be here, and questions are usually answered in a timely fashion. This is a good place to learn and have fun! :thumbsup:
     
  8. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    hi joe, add my warm welcome too!
    feel free to 'flounder' around here:lol:
     
  9. jcb500

    jcb500 New Member

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    Great!!!! Thanks!!!
     
  10. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    Welcome and enjoy your stay! :) I'm just learning, too, but there's good info and great folks here and very helpful and patient! :)

    My wife's son is in cullinary school in CA right now. He's really enjoying it. I keep asking him when I'm going to see him on Iron Chef or Chopped. :D

    Allez Cuisine!
     
  11. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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  12. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a large HOW-DEE from Texas!

    a snip...
    Or maybe you mean that you did start your nuc with the new queen, but the strong hive robbed out the nuc, killing the new queen in the process?

    tecumseh:
    that is what is sounds like to me.

    there are several approaches to your prior problem. 1) you can move the split off some ways (at least 2 miles is usually the suggest distance) so the bees you place in the nuc cannot find their way back home or 2) after making up the nuc and tossing in the queen in her introduction cage close the unit totally up (screen the entries) for 2 days. a dark cool spot is usually suggest as place to store the hive to limit the effect of heat and the dark keeps them quiet.
     
  13. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    Welcome Joe:hi:
     
  14. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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  15. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    welcome aboard joe
     
  16. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    :hi:Greetings Joe on having joined the forum. You'll see that a lot of different beekeepeers will give you different suggestions-- You are responsible for the advice you choose to follow. That way you still take full credit for what we hope will be successfully reaching a satisfactory solution.. :grin:
     
  17. crackerbee

    crackerbee New Member

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