new from Indiana

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by rw02kr43, Feb 21, 2012.

  1. rw02kr43

    rw02kr43 New Member

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    Hello everyone. I'm from Indiana and don't have any bees or a hive yet. I'm still trying to decide if this is something I want to do. The startup cost is so high and I'm afraid I'll kill all my bees or they will leave. Anyone else from Indiana on here?

    Jason
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    howdy from Texas.

    we have several Indiana folks here. hang around they will show themselves after a while.
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Welcome, and hello from Nova Scotia, Canada! :hi:
    Find yourself a beekeeper who is close and see if they will let you tag along a time or two.
    Costs don't have to be all that great, it depends on how you start. Are you reasonably able to build some of your stuff (bees can be very forgiving in this dept.) Look up Top Bar Hives, while a little unconventional they can be built from scrap wood quite easily.
    Swarms don't cost much to catch, and you may even be able to make a buck or two picking some up.
    Read and read, and spend some time here, you will find the enthusiasm for bees infectious! :mrgreen:
     
  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Welcome to the forum :hi:

    Another idea is to find a local bee club. Now would be a great time for that since everybody is just starting to get geared up for spring. There are usually free beginners classes (and don't be shy in this area, have been to many of them and several did not have any bees) and you will find that most keeps are very helpful and want to share.

    Good luck on your decision and yes bees are very addicting!
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  6. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Welcome Jason! There is always greater risk in agriculture. There are also ways to get into beekeeping for under $100. We have managed to hold the cost down for 4 years to $106 for a hive with screened bottom board, migratory cover, two supers with frames and foundation and bees with a marked queen. You could start without the second super and invest in a veil or smoker. Smokers and veils can be found at GloryBee during sales.
     
  7. Indiana Dave

    Indiana Dave New Member

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    :hi: Welcome to the right place!!! You will learn more here than anywhere. Where in Indiana are you from?
     
  8. jim314

    jim314 New Member

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    Welcome Jason. If you do decide to do it, I think you will be glad you did. I started with 2 packages and a swarm last year and all 3 are doing very well. It is a little intimidating to read about all the loses other people have, but don't let that stop you. I was prepared to lose one or even two, but lucked out. Can't say it was from skill :)
    Jim
     
  9. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    Welcome and enjoy your stay! :)

    If you're still on the fence about jumping in, find a local beekeeper or association and go out with them to their hives and help them inspect and work on their hives. You will be able to tell if you're up to it or not by that. Some folks know in less than 10 seconds that it's not for them. Fortunately, that's a slim minority. I hope you figure things out and take the plunge with the rest of us. It's not a job, it's an adventure!

    Good luck!
     
  10. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Greetings to you Jason! :hi:
    Look how much good advice you've already been given without even owning one bee.
    I'll step out on a limb and suggest that before you spend any money on equipment, reach a decision as to whether you're willing to get stung (not financially). Remember, there is no such thing as beekeeping without stings.
    If you're willing to accept that "cost" of the profession, the rest should be clear sailing.
    Before you answer that question, keep in mind that stings are considered to have side health benefits. :eek:
     
  11. rw02kr43

    rw02kr43 New Member

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    Thanks everyone. We do have a few beekeepers around here. I have tried to talk to a few. Many either aren't very helpful, or teach classes and want to push those. For a fee of course. I'm also worried about any city ordinances about bees. We recently moved to a very small town in southern IN. I would think there would be no problems having bees, but it seems there might be possibly. I'm going to the city clerk tomorrow to see if I can get some real answers. As for getting stung, that doesn't bother me. I get stung all the time anyway when I'm not even near a beehive.

    Jason
     
  12. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    Welcome Jason:

    Check out craigslist for beekeeping equipment. I found a $450.00 extractor for $60.00. All it needed was cleaned up. I also found a garage sale listed on cl where I got 2 veils (brand new) a smoker (used once) and 2 copies of beekeeping for dummies-total cost? $10.00. I found that you have to tweak craigslist a little. Use the search engine and type in beekeeping, then go back to the search engine and type in beekeeping equipment, then go back and type in beekeeping supplies, etc. etc. Also try honey bees, bee hives, etc. You get the idea. Craigslist is kind of literal when searching for something you requested, but it is a great resource.
    One caution, however. Be careful if you are purchasing used woodenware. You may end up with someone elses problems.
    As others have suggested, find a beekeeping club/association in your area. You can also use the web. http://www.worldofbeekeeping.com, and http://www.honeybeesonline.com offer free online, step-by-step lessons. Ignore the commercial aspects (buy my book and learn more!) of these sites.
    Beekeeping is a very fun and rewarding hobby (or in my case-obsession) Good luck, and I hope you decide to give it a try. I'm going into my second year, so I'm a newbee too. Keep us posted, we're a close and friendly bunch on this forum.
     
  13. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    Hello Jason,

    I live in Brown County, near the State Park. As others have mentioned, one of the best ways to learn is to find a local club. Here's a map of local clubs in Indiana. There are a number in southern Indiana:
    http://www.in.gov/dnr/entomolo/files/ep ... _assoc.pdf

    Yes, there is often a fee for beginner's beekeeping classes. Depending on who is offering the class, it's usually just to cover handouts, refreshments or whatever. The IN State Beekeepers will be offering their beginner's class on March 3rd in conjunction with their spring meeting in Anderson. A bit of a drive from Southern Indiana, but (free) overnight accomodations are available if you wanted to drive up Friday evening. If interested, more info here:
    http://www.hoosierbuzz.com/
     
  14. rw02kr43

    rw02kr43 New Member

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    I went to town hall yesterday to ask about city limits on bees. They said there was nothing on the books. Then they showed me the books. :yahoo: I might be picking up a used hive this weekend maybe if the guy will reply back. I priced out the parts of buying new and this one comes out ahead going with used.

    Jason
     
  15. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    You're on your way. :clap:
     
  16. BoilerJim

    BoilerJim New Member

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    Welcome fellow Hoosier. :wave:

    Jim
     
  17. rw02kr43

    rw02kr43 New Member

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    well maybe not. Yesterday I went to the town hall to ask questions. today I get a call saying they are concerned about bees since we live across the street from a park. So, I'm supposed to go to a town hall meeting on March 5th to beg for the privilege of having bees. We just moved here and chose this place cause it's a tiny town, and no home owners association to tell us what we can and can't do on our own property. If someone would get stung, how could they prove it was my bee? Do all my bees have a brand? this is just so stupid. I should have just gone ahead and did it instead of trying to be the nice guy and let them know what I was doing before hand.

    Jason
     
  18. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    what was it ray wylie hubbard said (sung and wrote in 'conversation with the devil')..

    doin' whats right ain't so hard, it just ain't as much fun.
     
  19. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    People are so paranoid about getting stung and always want to blame the beekeeper.

    At the tow meeting be sure to ask what the town is doing about yellow jackets, wasp, hornets, fire ants, mosquitoes, etc. (you know anything that can bite or sting). Be sure to ask how far away from the park you would be allowed to keep bees, when they answer with "need to be a mile away", just remind them that honey bees forage up to about a 3 mile radius of the hive for nectar and pollen.

    Most on the town meeting know nothing of honey bees and they are just a stinging pest to them. Be prepared to answer some very pointed questions and educate them a little. There may not be a law on the books specifically ruling out "honey bees" but they will try to classify them as a nuisance, and a couple of complaints and they will be knocking at your door. There are other ways to handle this when that time comes.

    If your back yard is small you can always build a 6 foot tall board fence or tall shrubs to make the bees fly up and over the tops of peoples heads plus it kind of hides your hives to boot. Keep them off of the fence between you and the neighbor also.

    Others will chime in with other ideas, this is a touchy subject between keeps and non keeps!
     
  20. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    welcome aboard. We do have a few from indiana on here. as for killing bees wont happen hard to kill a hive. lose a hive will happen you can expect losses if your going to have bees. start up cost are what you make of it. to have all the bells and whistles yes its expensive. but to get started with the bare nescessities you can get by pretty cheap.