New hive without queen?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by queen_bee09, May 3, 2010.

  1. queen_bee09

    queen_bee09 New Member

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    Hi,
    I started my first 5 hives on April 15th. While doing my second week hive inspections, I noticed that one of my hives had no capped brood, no eggs that I could see, and no queen to be found. All of my other hives are bursting with brood on 2-3 frames ( both sides! so excited) Anyways, I'm not sure when I should order a new queen. I don't want my workers to start laying, and they can't make another, since I don't think the original got a chance to lay any eggs. But I also don't want to buy a queen and then discover that I still have one. So basically, whats the longest amount of time I should wait before getting a new queen in there? And how can I make sure shes really gone?

    Thanks for your help!
     
  2. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    I would put the hive on top of one of the other hives using a newspaper method (or simply shake them out), and allow the extra bees to help boost the good colony(s).

    Reasoning....Even if you put in a queen now, it will take another 24-26 days until her eggs are emerging as bees. During that time, the colony will continue to die off, and will get to a point that any recovery will be very hard to overcome.

    Build up the 4, then in a month, take two or three frames from each and instantly make a new hive with a new queen. You don't have the resources to do that now and the hive is already three weeks old with no brood production. Combine, and split another day....
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    requeening hives that have been queenless or hives that allow drone laying queens for any period of time are very difficult (almost impossible) to requeen.

    when faced with the same problem here, I do just what Bjorn has described.
     
  4. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    You can use the newpaper method to merge the hives which can be split a bit latter. Or you can order a new queen and have her shipped over night UPS. Look in the hive again to make shure there isn't a queen before the new one gets there.

    You can also go to sembabees.org and contact Roger Sutherland for some one in your area to mentor you. Tell him Al of Garden View Apiaries sent you. We are also in SE Michigan.

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  5. queen_bee09

    queen_bee09 New Member

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    I just wanted to say thanks for all the help. We did end up combining with another hive until we could get our hands on a queen. But we had the fun task of relocating the hive and shaking it out because we had a laying worker. We split and re-queened on Sunday and have our fingers crossed that this one will do better.