New hive

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by mcbobie, May 3, 2010.

  1. mcbobie

    mcbobie New Member

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    I started my first hive last weekend. Rather than shaking the bees from the package I just uncovered it and set it in the bottom brood box with 5 frames of foundation, because I didn't think there would be enough room for 10,0000 bees on 4 frames with a boardman feeder in it I put another brood box on top of that with 9 frames of foundation and the boardman feeder.
    When I opened it yesterday it lookes like they are only drawing comb on the top box. Will they start drawing comb on the bottom box when they run out of room or will I have to rotate them?
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Get one box off. You should put 10 frames in the box you leave on. 9 frames of foundation will give you a mess of misplaced comb.

    Remove the shipping cage, the feeder, and the top box. Place any frames they are working in the bottom, being sure you have a total of 10. Then slide them tightly together in the center, leaving any extra space equally on each side.Place the feeder on the front of the hive, or above the inner lid, with an empty box and the outer lid on top of that.

    The only time you want to have 9 frames in the hive is after they draw out 10 frames in a honey super, you can then remove one and run nine frames of drawn comb in the honey supers only. The brood chamber should always have 10 frames per box.
     

  3. Omie

    Omie Active Member

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    Idee, what is the advantage of having 9 instead of 10 frames in the medium honey supers?- is it just because it's lighter to lift, or are there other advantages?
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    It's actually a little heavier. They draw the comb out a bit farther, so there is a little more honey. Also, with the comb drawn out past the wood of the frame, the uncapping knife will remove all of the cappings with one stroke. You won;t have to dig the shorter cell caps out. This is, of course, only if you extract. If you crush & strain, or cut comb honey, it doesn't do much at all.
     
  5. rast

    rast New Member

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