New Location

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by crazy8days, Aug 25, 2012.

  1. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    I was reading in my Indiana Beekeepers' Association booklet that the first week of August you should have your bees in their new location if moving them. I want to move my two hives I have at home to my other location in the country. Wouldn't it be better after fall flow? Or do I need to get my butt moving and get them out in the country! Was reading that a "S" pattern is the way to go so you don't have wondering bees going to hives on the sides and making the middle hive weaker. How big of an "S" do I need? How far apart from each hive is required?
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Which place has the stronger fall flow?

    If you wait until after the fall flow, move them on a warm day when most foragers are out. That will reduce the number of mouths to feed when no more food will be coming in. None of the foragers will be winter bees at that time and are no longer needed. They are just a drain on reserves.
     

  3. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    The one out in the country. Should I get moving?
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Yes................
     
  5. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    If you're not doing anything want to help setup? In the 90's today. But, there is a breeze! What about this "S" configuration?
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I would go out at dusk, load them on the truck, and ride. I don't close them in. I don't strap the hives. I just load and go.

    If using a trailer, strap them tight. Wind is entirely different.

    Never heard of the S. A dab of paint or a brick or block, or anything else to make one a bit different from the others should work as well or better to reduce drifting.
     
  7. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    It's dusk right now and the front of both hives are covered in bees. What to do with those? Smoke?
     
  8. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    YES....................... Gently and give them a few minutes to move in. May take 2 or 3 repeats.
     
  9. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Ok, after I move them to their new home. do I need to put a entrance reducer on? Sm. hole? Also, do I need to feed till they get going. These two hives are not as strong as the one they will be next to. Also, what kind of spacing? I want to grow next year and somewhat limited on space before traffic will see them. Thanks
     
  10. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    "do I need to put a entrance reducer on?"

    The traffic should keep the entrance about 3/4 full without a traffic backup.

    "do I need to feed till they get going?"

    I would feed if the stores weigh less than 40 lb.
    PS. It is robbing season. Internal feeder only. NO BOARDMAN this time of year.


    "what kind of spacing?"

    Enough to work comfortably between them without bumping into the next one.
     
  11. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Got them moved to there new home without a sting! My son helped me and oddly I think he tried to get stung to show me hi is tough. If you read most of my post you know I have 1 hive that has been dragging their feet all year. They are on their second deep and when my son and I pick them up they were sooo light. I've been feeding then all summer. State Inspector said they look good just need fed. Well, I hope moving them and with fall bloom starting they can add weight. If not, I don't think they will make it this winter. Could be wrong. I know here at the house they were bringing in lots of pollen. Thought that was going to boost them up. Thinking with all the homes with plants and small wildflower fields around they would do great. Not the case.
     
  12. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    My thoughts are, if a hive doesn't make it, maybe next year's bees will have better genetics. You will always lose some, in any type of livestock.
     
  13. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Reading Reidi_tim post on his weaker nucs I am wondering if I should combined my two weaker hives. Get rid of the queen in the weakest hive and have 4 deeps. If I should when? After this falls flow? Wait a week cause I just moved them? now? I can't really tell how much the hives weigh. I know the strongest hive you can't budge. The weakest 2 deeps my son and I picked up and was shocked how light it was, Second hive was heavier but not by much. I'm going off the strong hive which one deep is heavier than both deeps on the other two hives. The two weak hives are from my house. They were bought nucs. Maybe cause I moved them they will pic up weight?