new nucs

Discussion in 'Raising Queens' started by Zookeep, Oct 21, 2012.

  1. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    Ill take pics but didnt today, I found 1 of my 5 frame nucs had become a bit over crowded and they built some swarm cells so I pulled the queen on 1 frame and split the other 4 frames into 2 nucs and added frames of brood and food, now I have 8 nucs going in different stages, I have lots of drones flying so getting the new queens mated should not be much of a problem.
     
  2. tommyt

    tommyt New Member

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    I hope they do well

    I just dropped a frame of eggs/larva in a trap out box,I had to pull it early (construction site)
    when I inspected it I saw an open Q cell but no queen
    It's only been 23 days since I put the first frame in
    Also had to take the box mid-day so this has me worried that the virgin may have been out on
    a mating flight came back to find the box GONE
    Hope the new queen will mate good enough to make it too next March
     

  3. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    It"s not fare, You guys in Florida still making nucs and us up here where we get 4 seasons have to put our pets away for the winter!
    I'm jealous.
    I bet it is easy to over winter bees when you don't get any winter.
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    an Apis snip...
    I bet it is easy to over winter bees when you don't get any winter.

    tecumseh...
    the world is simply turned upside down here Apis... which is to say that our problem is getting hives to make it thru the long hot and very dry summer months. we do get a wee bit more winter than they do in Florida but the length of time the hive is dormant is just very very short.
     
  5. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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  6. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Strain of bee

    New nucs in Florida ----- winter preps in BC. Novices please note.

    The best strain for you may be a successful local mutt. The grass may look greener but not work well in your yard. :smile:
     
  7. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Good point Barbarian! from across the pond in Great Britten. Good idea to check where the posts are coming from to and to check there weather so you don't become (for the lack of a better word) misled.
     
  8. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    Zookeep, as you practice beekeeping in Florida, do you have mite resistant bees or must you treat more often to control them? They certainly have more time to work against you and your bees. :)
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    good point Lburou.... I do know that in places like Hawaii where there is no winter and where the small hive beetle has recently been introduced that the lack of a winter creates it's own problem.
     
  10. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    as far as the mites go I think cause a hive never reduces in numbers for winter and the fact that almost all my hives are survivors caught in the wild, the hives are able to resist well, Ive only seen 3 mites in the last year in my hives.
     
  11. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    You must be producing some queens for sale, right? Those are the genes our breeders need! ;)
     
  12. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a lee burough snip...
    Those are the genes our breeders need!

    tecumseh...
    I would reckon zookeep raises good bees but our larger problems as beekeeper is a bit more more complex than that. At this time my best guess is that very large numbers are likely a requirement for getting to the place where bees have a chance to thrive in the current environment without some chemical crutch. As much as anything this thinking is someone defined by what I have read in regards to foulbrood and what was the initial Minnesota Hygienic program <it took thousands and thousands of hive that perished before the one or two could be found that had resistance to the disease.
     
  13. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    But they got there and that is encouraging!!
     
  14. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    here is a update on the nucs, went out to the yard and opened them up and all are doing great, I have 3 golden fatty queens 1 thats kinda a burnt color and 1 thats totally black all are laying like these shots of just 1 of the nucs.
     

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  15. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    That reminds me of a friend's account of Alaskan weather. We had flown together overseas and had some aviation history in the cockpit together. When we arrived to serve in Alaska he was talking of the four seasons and how short Spring time was there. He told us how, during a four hour flight from Fairbanks to Anchorage, he had missed Spring that year. ;)

    I hope all your NUCs become boomers Zookeep :)