New plastic frames

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by brooksbeefarm, Jun 27, 2011.

  1. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Well new to me it's new :lol: , i got desperate and ordered a 100 (deep) sheets of plastic foundation from Mann Lake, it's heavy yellow looking stuff, with a good wax feeling. Has anybody used it? and how do you like it? I know, I know, but i got desperate. :mrgreen: Jack
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I guess I am the heratic here. I use wooden frames and plastic foundation. Permadent is the manufacturer, black for deeps, white for mediums (honey supers).
    They are wax coated and don't seem to have a problem getting drawn. I know wax would probably get accepted quicker, but as is being dicussed on another thread as we speak, it takes me maybe 3 to 5 seconds to pop one in a frame! :mrgreen:
    Cost is another matter all together. :roll:
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    that is the stuff I am currently experimenting with... I bought the uncoated ones and applied my own wax. it is a bit heavy but on those hives that pulled foundation (given our season not as many of those as planned) it seems to work quite well. I couldn't decide when I put the frames together if I wanted to remove the perforated corner tabs... still ain't certain if that was a good move or not.
     
  4. Bsweet

    Bsweet Member

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    I use the yellow plastic foundation and love it. Its great when the wax moth or SHB show up as its pretty easy to clean that area and reuse. If you use it in honey supers you don't have to worry about blow outs in the extractor. As some will say, at times its hard to get them drawn but I have had that prob with wax at times. jim
     
  5. Bsweet

    Bsweet Member

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    A couple of years ago I got acouple of deeps with all plastic frame/foundation and they did ok. So I decided to order 100 more frames to play with, the supplier screwed up and sent me the more expensive green drone frames. I don't use the drone frames but rather than send them back I plan to try them as frames in some deep honey supers and see what happens( more than likely they will not draw drone comb and fill with honey but who knows?).
     
  6. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    They might draw and fill the drone comb. If you look in your brood box where drone comb was drawn out and after they are finished rearing drones it will be back filled with honey.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    what G3 said..

    Kelley use to make some odd sized foundation that would almost always got drawn into drone comb. Kelley's selling point was that the queen didn't like to lay in this stuff and therefore it would discourage the queen from laying upward. Most times this never worked so well for me since invariable the queen would first lay these up with drones but by the end of the season they did get filled with nectar.
     
  8. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    Everyone I know uses plastic frames. My mentor suggested going plastic when I purchased my first pieces of equipment. Whenever foundation is mentioned, at our local bee club, they are talking about plastic. The only person I ever heard talk negatively about plastic was a guest speaker from Detroit. He didn't want any petroleum products in his hives and honey. I thought, "You live in Detroit, for Heaven's sake! The air you breath is full of toxic junk!"
     
  9. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  10. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I think it was called 7/11 comb, forgot what it stood for though, the cell size was supposed to be odd. Too big for worker cells, too small for drone cells, something like that.
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I think you pinned the details down nicely G3. For some reason my bees always pulled out the wax into drone comb and it did get laid up in drones quite often even though the supplier claimed the queen would not desire to lay in the stuff.
     
  12. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Tec, did you break off the corner tabs? I guess it would make it easier for the workers and the queen to change sides. :confused: Jack
     
  13. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    no I did not Jack. that would be my guess also... but at the time I couldn't decide if it was a good idea or not so I just left them.
     
  14. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    The one time I tried plastic, it was a mixed blessing. The ten frames I bought (wooden top bar,plastic sides, bottom and foundation--made in England) snapped together in no time. BUT the bees didn't like building the combs. They would build their own combs braced onto the plastic foundation. When I measured the imprinted cell bases, they came out to be 1/10th of a mm smaller than standard brood cells. I needed a caliper to measure that. I guess the bees have their calipers built-in.