New Queen in, wax worm out

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by ndm678, Jun 6, 2012.

  1. ndm678

    ndm678 Member

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    I inspected my hive yesterday, 26 days since adding the 3lb package. I found no queen, no brood (capped or uncapped) and did not see any eggs. I felt it was time to make an executive decision and get another queen in there. She was met with no hostility, but I still left the candy cork in, just to be safe. The sound and activity level drastically changed. They have become very active and loud. After loading her royal highness in I witnessed 2 bees meet their demise. They starting shaking (looked like a seizure) and they were attacked by other bees and were killed and removed from the hive rather quickly.
    I went out a couple of hours later to gaze from afar, that's when I saw it. I saw a wax worm half hanging out of a hole it burrowed into my bottom board. I've read that wax worms outside the hive are nothing to worry about, but this one was half way in. Should I fill the hole with something (glue ect)? I didn't see an others hanging out, I didn't see any inside.
    What should I do now?
     
  2. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    hmmm. Those seizures don't sound good. Wax moth trying to get in is not the same as wax moth in, the bees will probably propylize the hole if it goes all the way through. They're good about that stuff. As long as you do not have too much "real estate" - too many boxes for number of bees to patrol, the bees can handle it. And as long as Hive is in SUN.

    Gypsi
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip..
    I saw a wax worm half hanging out of a hole it burrowed into my bottom board.

    tecumseh:
    may I assume you have one of those factory made bottom boards which is relative new????

    if yes then..... from the time you installed the package debris falls from the brood nest and a hive with only 10000 workers (the approximate number of worker bees in 3#) has a difficult time keeping the floor properly swept. when this wax debris fall into the cracks (or even small knots) in a bottom board the wax moth fairly quickly finds this small niche and lays eggs. after some period with a growing population the floor not only gets swept but all those little wood working imperfection get properly propolized and those kinds of problem go away (which should somewhat answer your question about what to do*).

    as to shaking I am not certain what that could be, but evidently if they were met at the door by the guard bees they didn't really belong to that hive anyway.

    I assume you have only one hive but your story provides all kinds of good reasons why no one should start with only one hive or one package. one frame of brood to boost the hive would certainly have made a great difference in the prospects of this hive.

    *after though.... since you have seen the presence of wax moth around the area of the bottom board I would from time to time (weekly or so) keep a close eye on the interior area of the bottom board and make certain no excessive debris accumulates in this area. with a weak adult population often time here this means I physically remove the bottom board and either sweep or scrape the accumulation.
     
  4. ndm678

    ndm678 Member

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    tecumseh:
    may I assume you have one of those factory made bottom boards which is relative new????

    ndm678:
    I made the bottom board, but its still new, its also screened, don't know if that changes things.


    tecumseh:
    as to shaking I am not certain what that could be, but evidently if they were met at the door by the guard bees they didn't really belong to that hive anyway.

    ndm678:
    They were inside the hive when the shaking incident occured. They later went on yesterday afternoon to have a 'drone cleaning party' I watched about a dozen or so drones get dragged out forcefully.

    tecumseh:
    I assume you have only one hive but your story provides all kinds of good reasons why no one should start with only one hive or one package. one frame of brood to boost the hive would certainly have made a great difference in the prospects of this hive.

    ndm678:
    I only have one hive. It wasn't supposed to be just one, but things happen like they are not supposed to, in the end one is what I was left with.

    Thank you for you help, its much appreciated
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2012
  5. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    When you made your screened bottom board, the size of screening does matter. Too large will allow moths to go through it easily. I use #8 when I make mine, large enough that shb can be kicked out through it by the bees. Wax moth wings won't quite slip through I think.

    I too started with one hive, only bought one, bought a bad one. We all learn. There is no teacher quite like experience.

    Gypsi
     
  6. ndm678

    ndm678 Member

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    I also used a #8 hardware cloth for screened bottom board. Thankfully the wax worm was burrowed on the outside. I saw the fine sawdust, but thought it housekeeping in a freshly built super. I also built a solid bottom board, but it was strangely warm when the girls arrived. Besides the ants, its the only pest I have seen. The ants hand around the outside and constantly getting buzzed away. I haven't seen any on the inside
     
  7. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Ant prevention is important too. Sprinkling cinnamon on the hive stand helps if you live where it doesn't rain and the wind doesn't blow. I use basins under hive stands, from peanut butter jar lids on top of blocks, to kitty litter boxes under cinder blocks, because I have so many ant species. I've put down beneficial nematodes, but they do better when we get more rain. I can upload a pic of the peanut butter jar lid with pvc coupling hive support if you want.

    It is not unusual to find small wax moth larva under your screen, as the bees boot them through it.