New To Beekeeping From Georgia.

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by Tomgillane, Sep 4, 2017.

  1. Tomgillane

    Tomgillane New Member

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    Hello, I am new to this forum and reallitively new to bee keeping. I live in the southern side of Atlanta, GA. I got my first bees in April of 2017 and am using the Flow Hive setup, with a bottom board, brood box, gueen excluder, 7 flow frames, vent screen, and gable roof cover. My bees are very productive, they already swarmed twice this late spring. To stop this, I add another brood box with success, they have not swarmed again. My flow frames are attracting bees but not producing any honey. Maybe next year. I will see everyone on the forum.
     
  2. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Welcome Tomgillane. I wish you success with the flow hive of course. we had some people who had bought them attend our bee club meeting and they hadn't had much luck either. Honey depends on a couple of things. Available nectar, which means rain at the right time and the right crops to be rained on, adequate workforce to bring it in, and room to store it. They may store it in the 2nd brood box.
     

  3. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    welcome aboard from Long Island,ny
     
  4. ccjersey

    ccjersey Member

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    The fact that they swarmed a couple times early in the season is likely the reason you haven't gotten any honey in the super. Since you are from the south too, I will caution you that the small hive beetles take advantage of colonies with extra real estate to patrol. I would go ahead and take off the flow hive super for this year and hope they fill their second brood box on the fall nectar and pollen flow to get ready for winter. If there is some stored honey or nectar in the super you may want to harvest it or simply put the frames out well away from your hive so the bees in the neighborhood can rob them out and clean them for you before storage.
     
  5. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    oh boy. Well Texas used to get rainfall every week or so except for a 6 to 8 week drought in summer. This would be prior to 1990. In the 90's rainfall was still scattered throughout the year, although the summer drought got a little longer.

    In 2005 we went into a drought that lasted 17 months or so before it broke with multiple inches of rain all at once. while things have improved a bit since, we are still experiencing months without rain, and then sudden very large deluges. This is not good for beekeeping. it is horrible for honey production when the weather period when rain is supposed to occur is totally dry. I threw out $70 worth of wildflower seed in bombs and broadcast last year. None germinated, our winter was dry.

    The flow hive purchasers I know, I believe I know 3, are all in North Texas. I'd say their product failure problems have a lot to do with the weather.

    What the flow hive has done is dramatically increase interest in beekeeping and pack local bee clubs with new members. And that is a good thing.
     
  6. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    ill add my 2 cents here since my friend has one of these flow hives, another friend bought it and gave it to him..my friend has kept bees before so it not new to him..my take on it is its an over priced gimmick that misrepresents itself..yes the upside are many people are starting bee keeping thinking you put this thing in your yard spin a handle and get honey..after the initial excitement wears off and they dont get honey and it doesnt work because its a flawed product in my mind, you will loose those people and they will bad mouth bee keeping and in the long run be hurtful...if you say different that is fine then post some real videos from people that bought this hive and have been successful in making and collecting honey..again this is MY opinion of the flow hive..
     
  7. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    what kind of pond? koi?
     
  8. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Koi and goldfish. The fish pay the bills at my house, I fix, clean and build ornamental ponds for a living.
     
  9. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    cool, I built a koi pond in my yard about 20 years ago, and they have been breeding, so I take my extras upstate and put them in my 5 acre pond, now some of the koi are over 2 feet long. they actually have personalities, the ones at my long Island pond eat worms out of my hand...I made my own in ground vortex filter system, I bought a plastic welder to make the tanks and put the fittings on, the store bought ones are a fortune..
     
  10. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    My climate is a bit different, I use an upper basin that is 4 ft x 8 ft and 24 inches deep for a filter. No media. Water enters at the top in the southwest corner, leaves at the top in the north east corner as a waterfall to the lower basin. I use it to raise water lilies and clean it out every couple of years. I use a lava rock prefilter in the lower pond around the pump.