new to forums...trying to learn how to ask questions...get answers

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by beetree, Apr 19, 2012.

  1. beetree

    beetree New Member

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    Hello, I'm Pam :smile:
    trying to learn best practices of working a manual extractor
    can you turn steady but constant to get good results or do you turn heart-attack fast?
    also...please describe best way to use a "comb" type decapper

    thanks...when using a forum...do I just stay on line waiting for someone to respond or do I go about my work and check back in...and if so how can I go directly to an answer for my specific question
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Hello Pam!!

    A manual extractor is just as a motorized one, need to start out slow and gradually speed up. If you go at a break neck speed to start off you will run the risk of a "blow out", meaning the weight of the honey will rip the comb out of the frame. Try to save the comb to put back into the honey supers, it gives the bees a head start on storing more honey. If you have a tangical type the frames will have to be turned around to get the back side and the extractor rotation so the bottom bar is the leading edge. A radial type gets the job done the first time.

    To use a capping "comb", I think you mean a capping scratcher. Some folks like to run it up under the caps and lift them off, others like to just scratch open the caps. As long as the cell is opened a little the weight of the honey will push its way out. The warmer your honey is the easier it is to extract.

    As far as waiting on your answer...........................well that can depend on who is around the forum to answer it, sometimes a few minutes to maybe the next day, hopefully not the latter. There is lots to look at and read about might just want to look around a little bit. You can also subscribe to the thread and it will send you an email when someone post to it.

    Hope that helps a little.
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    In addition to what g3 said, we also have a search window. Many questions have already been answered in the 50,000 plus posts on the forum.
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Hi Pam:
    When I use my two frame manual (tangential) I start off slow for the first 15 seconds so the balance between the two frames evens out a bit (no wobbeling). Then I pick up speed and run for another 45 seconds. Then I flip my frames and do the same thing on the other side.
    If you are using beeswax foundation it is recommended to spin out half the honey on the first side, flip your frames, spin out all the honey on the second side, and then flip them back again to finish off the first side. This is done in order to avoid the blowouts that can happen as G3 described.
     
  5. rast

    rast New Member

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    And that purty new white comb is a lot more fragile than older comb, easier to blow out.
    Rereading, I'm going to add some more you may already know. Scratch over a pan with some cheescloth or something in the bottom cause there can be a lot of honey in the cappings and scratch softley. You don't want to take half the cell off with the scratcher if you can help it.
     
  6. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    welcome to the forum Pam.
     
  8. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    Welcome Pam:
    You have found the best and funnest place to learn. One thing about our home here-you can ask 10 beeks the same question and get 12 different answers. You just need to figure out what works best for you.
    Personally, I use 2 cold knives for uncapping, 1 warming up in hot water-and the other in hand. When it cools down, I switch. I also have a capping scratcher handy for the recessed cells that the knife can't reach.
    I learned the hard way about using my hand-cranked 3/6 frame extractor. Start slow and gradually increase the speed. You don't need to crank at "heart-attack" speed. Centrifugal force takes care of extracting the honey.
    Good luck.
     
  9. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Welcome to the forum Pam :hi: Look how fast the answers are pouring in!!
    Truth to tell, sometimes you have to wait a lot longer.
    I can't disagree with anything that's been written so far. Give special heed to Perry's description and Rast's "warning". It's really such a shame when beautiful new combs suffer a blowout. Second time around they are stronger and as they age, they continue to gain strength.
    Using an uncapping fork is an art. Get the tines parallel to the capped cells, move them along just below the cappings, trying not to get into the honey. There is a small air space between the cappings and the honey and if you stay in that space, you can move smoothly and not get bogged down in the honey.The cappings "peel off" almost dry and all the honey is yours to extract.
    It's not as easy as it may sound, but that's what to aim for.
     
  10. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    All good responses about extracting, and great explanation from efmesch about use of uncapping fork.
    Welcome to The Forum:hi:
     
  11. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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  12. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    welcome aboard Pam
     
  13. Indiana Dave

    Indiana Dave New Member

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    Welcome to the forum. Many of us learn as we go with great advice from this forum as our 'mentors'.