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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just talked to my friend and fellow newbee and he said his neighbor called and said he had honey bee's in a water line cut off box. My first thought was yellow jackets, but my friend just went an checked and he said it was honey bee's. My first question is, is this possible. Question two, how do we get them out. I was thinking we should do it just like a tree, remove comb and rubber band it in frames. Any other advise would be appreciated, if it turns to bee the real thing.
 

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Well first things first, a water cut-off box in not very large, why yellow jackets sounds better then honeybees, though is a bit early in the year to start being a pest. If it is in fact honeybees, and you have the proper gear and protective equipment, and what you do will not become a hazard for walkers and bicycle riders passing by without and knowledge of what your doing. Then a cut-out under those conditions would be the best way to go, use a bee-vac to suck up most of the bees, find and secure the queen, and rubber band in place the combs into brood frames ( deep supers/ brood chamber ). When you actually open this water shut off Box then you will see the job at hand. Take pictures of what you have before you start and we'll have a meeting of the minds, see what we can offer as advise for you. Welcome back to the forum.
Barry
 

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I think i heard or read that AHB have made it to Tenn.? I've not had any experience with them, but hear they like those water cut off boxes for their hive.never heard of European bees making home under ground. Just a heads up, and be careful. Jack
 

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Brooks is 99% correct. In 35 years, I have found 4 hives of Italians under ground. 2 in water meter boxes, and 2 in tree roots. In other words, NOT OFTEN. Approach them with caution.
 

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I just came in to work from the TBBK meeting. We had a guy from UF there tonight talking about the AHB. he is the only one in the state that is allowed and licensed to have AHB apairy.

According to him, AHB like to build their hives in water boxes, electrical boxes and in the open on tree roots. They are not particular as to the size and location of their hive. He also said that if you do remove an AHB hive, chances are you will not know it until about 45 days after you have them at your yard.

Once they have brood in the hive is when they become agressive.

Robert
 

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remove comb and rubber band it in frames.
I use chicken wire formed and stapled to the frame,be sure to use just enough staples(I use 3 staples on each side)to hold the wire in place because you'll need to remove it later after the bees have braced it to the frame in a week or so.Have the frames ready with one side already stapled,then lay the comb in(be sure to place it the same way it came out)and staple the other side,and place in the hive body first before adding other frames.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ok. When we got there, I went to look at the box and there was a few bees coming and going thru the hole in the top. I got out the smoker, gave them a few puffs and waited a couple of minutes. When I opened the lid, there were no bees. There was about 10 dead in the bottom of the box. The only thing I can figure is they were scout bees, or they were there for the moisture inside. I left a hive with drawn comb sitting beside the box in case they were scouts. What say you all with experience?
 
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