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Just got back from a road trip.
Got an email from our Provincial Bee Health Advisor, asking if anyone would be willing to go check out a new beeks hives. They bought 4 nucs (installed in their own 10 frame equipment) and had moved them to their farm about a week ago. I talked to them on the phone and clearly they needed some advice and guidance so I agreed to drive out this afternoon and go through all 4 hives with them. I went through the first 3, showing how I did things and then had them go through the last one. Along the way I showed them what nectar, pollen, larvae looked like along with the difference between drones, workers, capped brood and honey. Found all 4 queens. Gave them some advice as best I could (they need to buy some inner covers, just strips of roof shingles laying on the top bars(?) otherwise they will never get the telescoping covers off in a few days).
Really nice folks but I'm afraid they have an awful steep learning curve in front of them. I left them my card and told them if they have any questions to not hesitate to call me.
(I should start a consulting service :mrgreen: )
 

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I've only been learning about bees for 3 years, but I'm seeing more new BKs this year who go ahead and get bees before they really learn much about them. I suspect all the news coverage about backyard and urban rooftop beekeeping is making folks feel it's easy just to buy some bees and put them in a box and that's it until you get some honey.
I myself have several friends who've announced to me they are going to get some bees, but they don't really have a plan to learn about it. One of them showed me a BKing paperback book from the 1960's that she bought in a garage sale and that's how she was going to learn how to keep bees. I told her lots has changed since then and she should get a more modern book that deals with things like varroa instead of emphasizing tracheal mites for example.
 

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I would guess when most folks start beekeeping that they all face a steep learning curve. one of the things about bee keeping that hasn't changed over the years is that there have always been folks like Perry to give folks a proper start up the curve.

Hats off to ya' Perry... good job.
 

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you da man :thumbsup:
 

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Way to go Perry, what a good neighbor and mentor you are, really speaks volumes about you to travel to some unknown peoples place and spend several hours with them :hi: hats off to ya.
 

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I wish Perry lived closer to me!

I really have had no problem getting advice from our local bee club when needed. We don't meet often enough for me, only once every even month.
 

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"(I should start a consulting service :mrgreen:)" I hear ya. I often feel that way, but then again, the satisfaction of the new beeks when they see something new or learn some new way of doing something is payback in and of itself. I've mentored 3 times in the past week--all folks very close to me, so not a big deal--and I'm very proud of these newbees. They're all doing a great job. Now this Wednesday, it's back up to Blounts Creek (my 2-hr drive) to take a peek at the Boy Scouts' new hives. It's been a while, so I'm hoping that all's well there. Director Allison says there's a lot of activity outside the hives, girls coming and going, so I'm encouraged. June 18 is the grand opening and ribbon cutting so I want the hives to be showing at their best at that time.
 

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PerryBee said:
Really nice folks but I'm afraid they have an awful steep learning curve in front of them. I left them my card and told them if they have any questions to not hesitate to call me.
(I should start a consulting service :mrgreen: )
Dang...I remember when we started out in 2008. We were even nervous to go out into the beeyard, and yes I remember it being an Everestian curve.

The woman we got the hive from charged us $20 an hour for a home visit, so maybe you should start a consulting service! I always felt better when I had a beekeeper I could talk to in person.
 

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Even though I complain about it, I would feel totally guilty charging for helping another beek. I wouldn't have believed it if you told me ten years ago that I'd be crusading for the honey bee in my old age, but here I am, doing everything I can to get more--preferably young--beekeepers!
 
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