Nitril gloves

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by PerryBee, May 6, 2012.

  1. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Got a box of these and started using them this year. They are great in that they are not bulky and give you a much better "feel" of what you are doing when handling frames, etc.
    But..........I can attest to the fact that they do not stop stings. Helping out an elderly gent with his 2 hives a couple of days ago and after the 4th or 5th shot (sometimes it just takes me that long :wink:) I came to the conclusion that they are not stingproof by any stretch. :lol:
     
  2. Medic1259

    Medic1259 New Member

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    What about the Yellow dish washing cloves I see some use? I have a Pair of bee gloves that go up the arm.. but I wont be able to work the Cam....lol
     

  3. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Following the unspoken encouragement (but personal example) of several forum members, I've returned to working gloveless. Much better control over what you're doing and I think I've probably received much fewer stings as a result--with gloves you don't feel when you're about to squeeze a bee and instigate a sting. When they want to, the bees can penetrate good leather gloves too.
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I am thinking the dishwashing gloves would be better for sure. (I just don't want my wife to see me with a pair of those that fit) :wink:
     
  5. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    I have some heavy red dishwashing gloves that I'm planning to try out. My old goatskin gloves are getting pretty old- I got them second hand as a gift.
     
  6. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    Thanks for the tip Perry.I have to go into a snarkie hive today and was thinking of using nitrils .Insttead I'll use dewberrys and duck tape.
     
  7. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    I knew it! Thanks for confirming this....sorry at your expense :wink:.....I can't afford to have a bum hand in my line of work...so, gloves are on for this guy....
     
  8. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    You can get the nitrile in various thicknesses and prices from very inexpensive to "if I was going to pay that much for gloves I'd hire someone to take care of the bees". :lol: Gempler's has them from 4 mil to 12 mil. Actually have some to 15 mil, but those look just like the dishwashing gloves.

    Walt
     
  9. guyross2

    guyross2 New Member

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    I got some at Lowes that were sold as painting gloves. There light green. My hands get sweaty if I keep them on for very long.
     
  10. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Never thought of it that way--we certainly wouldn't want you to have an itchy trigger finger. :lol:
     
  11. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I have blue "chemical proof" nitrile gloves from Home Depot. Very thick. I am allergic to latex, but these are the nitrile dishwashing gloves. My hands sweat, but I don't have time to deal with stings. I can feel the buzzing when a bee is close, that is good enough for me.

    Gypsi
     
  12. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    I am truly surprized Perry..... good quality Nitrile is supposed to be puncture proof.. I remember seeing an ad showing a guy pushing a fork into them without damage.

    Yep bg-7005fork.jpg

    When I was starting out I used them all the time and never took a sting through them, now I mostly go gloveless and without veil too.

    Yes on the sweat, they do sweat a lot ...

    Last thought , in Africa with the prevalence of HIV , most healthcare providers double glove......might be worth trying, takes almost nothing away from tactile sense.
     
  13. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    It matters where you buy your nitrile gloves on the thin ones. Home Depot's are so thin they won't hold up when I'm working with silicone and sealants. They are the ones in the paint department. The heavy chemical gloves are with the work gloves - I use those for bees.

    The gloves I wear for silicone work are medical nitrile gloves - available at drug stores and Costco, 100 count box. They might not hold up to stings, but they work lots better than HD's painting nitriles on chemical work.

    Gypsi
     
  14. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    ROFL How true! :lol:
     
  15. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    I can easily feel the buzzing also. My wife works for a medical company that uses the gloves. They have to use a specific kind and sometimes the vendor sends them the wrong ones by accident and she gets "freebies" for me. I'm still new at this, so I don't know how effective they are for sting protection. I wear them to keep my hands from getting sticky while working in my hive.