No patience - does BeeQuick work?

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by Gypsi, Jun 8, 2012.

  1. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,747
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I am thinking about evicting the bees from the bee tree by myself today, and moving them into a Lang a few feet away. Then whenever I can get someone else with a suit to help me move them, they are all boxed up. I bought some BeeQuick after seeing it used in a removal on Youtube. Then heard it didn't work. Has anyone else tried it? I have a Lang medium with a hole in the bottom board sitting over the beetree right now.

    I can use smoke, or I can use Beequick and probably force all of the bees up into the box, which has 10 frames of comb, and just need to remove and rubber band the comb that is in the tree. Maybe get some honey at the same time.

    Good idea? Bad idea?

    Gypsi
     
  2. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,747
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    38
    beetree_swarm3_26_2012.jpg beetree_trap4_11.jpg
    Only the medium box is still on it now. They are mainly entering and exiting at ground level, I dumped gravel around it yesterday. Can shoot some smoke in and do it again (properly suited of course.) Can set a hive up to the left along the fence line to hold them in until I get help to carry it. I am not lifting a full hive, probably 2 boxes, full of ticked off bees by myself. Have cinderblocks. Have solid bottom board. Have cooler afternoon today than anytime in the next 3 months probably...

    What do you think?
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Bee quick will move them off honey, pollen or empty comb.

    Bee quick WILL NOT move them off brood.

    ""and just need to remove and rubber band the comb that is in the tree.""

    Do that with bees on the comb and the job is done. That is the best way. Once the comb with queen is in the hive, all others will follow.
     
  4. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,747
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Making a pot of coffee. I think I'm going to do this today. (Need to run a soaker hose, and their guard bees do not approve of my presence.) Thank you Iddee!
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  6. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,747
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Wow - that was a big one. I could cut this open, but I don't want to. It is a beautiful garden ornament, it just needs a concrete base and a plexiglass window to keep future swarms out. Or it is a permanent swarm trap. Haven't decided. I like the kitty litter scoop idea. Pretty cool!
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Wish you luck with it, however you decide to go about it.
     
  8. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,747
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Well, the bees are out of the stump, stump is on its side. I just pulled the medium box off the top and moved it first, bees and all. set it on the trailer without a bottom board, next to my final destination for the rest.

    I suspect the queen might have been in it, if she is still there, then she is still there. But I was working alone and couldn't get fancy. I can't carry a full dual box hive alone the distance it had to move (about 100 feet, around a fence, on top of my old roofing trailer.)

    Then I started cutting comb out at the top. Top layer was mainly fresh capped honey. Maybe 5 lbs. Threw it in a bucket with a lid. 6 frames of brood rubber banded into deep frames. This only left me with 3 or 4 lbs of bees clustering on the sides and base of the trunk. So I broke out my old bee vac, no modifications, and started sucking them up. I did a few, opened it to be sure they were landing alive (they were, and yes there was a banana smell). Then I kept sweeping them up. Foragers started returning with full pollen pouches on their legs, Kept vacuuming. Finally the heat was killing me, the bees were thinner, I tipped the hive over on its side, grabbed a couple of honey combs and one brood comb from the bottom, banded the brood in, and moved the deep to the bottom board. It's up pretty high. So I left the medium set aside, opened the beevac and dumped it on top of the deep, and ran. (courage is a good set of heels.) That medium was about 1/3 full of bees. Without frames in it, solid bees. Very unhappy bees.

    Removed the 10 or so bees from the outside of my bee suit's hood before going in my house. Ran some soup across the street for our Friday night dinner on the neighbor's patio, then went back and moved the beevac box down into the bed of the trailer, in front of the hive, put the medium on, lifted the lid and checked for bees - there were some, and closed the lid. Lots of bees need to find their way into the box.

    On the bright side, I only had 2 or 3 buzzing me this last trip. Downside, some are drying themselves out from a bit of rainwater in the trailer toolbox I'm using for a hive stand. But they were mainly still alive. (I'd unstopped the drainhole before dumping the beevac box, but it hadn't fully drained... Ooops.)

    They were doubtless getting testy because they were running out of room. That trunk was packed. Almost no beespace, and they were moving up into the medium, so the queen may well be in there.

    I stuck a nuc swarm trap on top of the tipped over trunk. There were bees on the outside of it when I looked last. Will figure out how to move them in the morning, if I don't get up early enough I'll have to beevac some more . Cool thing about having the truck in the shop. I'm off.

    Gypsi
     
  9. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Sounds like you did well. All of them should be where the queen is tomorrow. Then you will know.
     
  10. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,747
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Thank you Iddee. That stump is a nice clear hollow now. Only 3 stings. I was ONLY going to move them from the stump into a hive in the garden, til I was adjusting my camera walking out my front door, without a suit, and one of the stalking bees stung me on the ear. By the way, vinegar on a fresh sting really helps. Benadryl is good too. At any rate, war was declared. They were too hot for the front garden.
     
  11. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,747
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    38
    If I can't get a queen, I can steal a frame of uncapped brood from one of my hives with better genetics and let them raise their own queen? The brood I got was mainly capped, white larva, fairly large. If I got any eggs, they are in with the honey probably.
     
  12. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    No need to guess. Wait 4 or 5 days and look for eggs and queen cells. If either are found, the hive is OK.
     
  13. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,747
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    38
    This queen's offspring may be african.
     
  14. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    May be mean african.

    May be mean Italian.

    May be docile african.

    May be docile italian.

    Only time will tell. Remember, beeks work africans from you to chili. They are not the end of the world. Same as any other, if mean, requeen.
     
  15. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,747
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I don't know if they are african, but they have been chasing me out of my garden since early April, and caused my melons to be quite late going in. I closed the large (beautiful) opening by shoving a wad of underlayment fabric in it, and tried to get them to use a box. They tunneled out from the bottom. From the pic, you can see how close my neighbors are. They had a garage sale last week and people were parking right next to this hive. With a/c weather, windows were up, no one got stung. It needed moved, and I intend to requeen. One of the bees stalking me, waiting for me to come out of the house yesterday pushed up the schedule when she stung me on the ear. My front door is a lot away and around some obstacles from their old site. She waited for me.

    beetree_empty6_9_12.jpg beetree_hive_ontrailer_6_9_12.jpg

    I have to tape my gloves, could get no actual pictures of bees yesterday, only got 3 stings. I've done a house cutout that was far less stingy... That's my beevac box on top, and the blue one is the nuc trap I left by the tree last night, and moved here this morning at 6. Only 100 feet of move. There are lots of bees on the log in the garden, but I expect many to be robbers. The lavender box is another trap hive, I put it there when I moved the blue one.
     
  16. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

    Messages:
    1,322
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    My own preference would be to order the queen you want, if your not happy with what you got.
    Barry
     
  17. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

    Messages:
    1,322
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    We discussed the difference between allowing the bees to raise what they want, vs what you want, I would order one of my choosing.
    Barry
     
  18. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,747
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I started trying to order one on Thursday evening, (after I had to suit up to finish a flower bed), Tom was out of town. Heard from him this morning. I'm going to pull a frame of brood from one of my VSH hives I got from him, just in case. He'll let me know whether he still has queens later today. I'm done. These bees won't make it through our deep summer dearth without being fed, and I'm not willing to be stung to feed them. Nor am I willing to have my hives robbed out if I don't. Just needs done.

    I'm ordering a queen, but installing open brood from a good hive if I can find any this morning, and if I can find this queen, she's dead. I may have lost her in the move yesterday. About to suit up and go out in the oven...

    Gypsi
     
  19. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,747
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    38
    beetree_1pm_sat6_9_12.jpg
    If the bees are where the queen is, she's still around this tree. They left their brood almost untended, and here they all are. I added a frame of brood covered with nurse bees, capped and uncapped, nice full deep frame, to the hive body. But guard bees and foragers are all over here guarding this trunk. I closed the hive body entrance to 2 bees wide to protect that frame of brood and nurse bees from robbers. I guess beevac these later this afternoon, put them in the hive and screen the entrance closed for 24 hours?
     
  20. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yes, it looks like she is still in the log. I would set the hive entrance into the mass of bees and see if they would go in. Now might be the time for a bit of bee quick in the other end of the log to convince them the hive is better.


    Larry Tate has queens ready to ship. His info is on the trading post.


    http://www.beekeepingforums.com/threads/6926-Queen-Bees-Hygenic-some-Waynes