No queen!!!

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by tmrschessie, Jul 18, 2012.

  1. tmrschessie

    tmrschessie New Member

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    When I captured the first bunch of bees from a cut out I found a small queen. She is not in the colony now. No eggs or brood. I have had these bees in the boxes for a couple weeks now. I just brought home the rest of the bees from the same cut out two days ago....and put them in two boxes of their own...there was no sign of a queen when I got them.

    My question is, I just ordered two bred queens. believe there are enough bees to take care of the queen in both boxes. I was told by the queen producer to leave her in the cage for 4 days then if the bees had not released her to poke a hole in the candy or take the candy out and put a piece of tape over the hole. Especially with the first group of bees will the accept her being an older group of unqueened bees? I have to try this to save them. Just thinking out loud. Tom
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    riverbee posted some picture on one of the treads (can't recall the title right now) with caged queens and the attention the worker SHOULD give to a new queen (when they don't already have one). for myself when I see worker's attending to a queen thru the wire or plastic of an introduction cage (as her pictures directly show) I typically release the queen after about one day by simply pulling the plug on the non candy end of the introduction cage..
     
  4. tmrschessie

    tmrschessie New Member

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    Thanks much for the quick replies. Great information in the link. Do you think that modified frame idea would be the best way to go? got a day or so before they get here.

    This is a first for me ... adding a queen. So want to do it right. I waited to check on the first bunch so as not to scare the colony off and I know the second group did not have any signs of a queen when I got them. Looks like I will have two colonies if this works out. Thank you again folks. Tom
     
  5. tmrschessie

    tmrschessie New Member

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    Also after reading more here, it sounds like I should combine all my bees into one or two at most deeps...does this sound about right? Tom
     
  6. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Sorry Tom, I must have missed part of the post.
    What are your hives configured like now?
     
  7. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    "riverbee posted some picture on one of the treads (can't recall the title right now) with caged queens and the attention the worker SHOULD give to a new queen (when they don't already have one). for myself when I see worker's attending to a queen thru the wire or plastic of an introduction cage (as her pictures directly show) I typically release the queen after about one day by simply pulling the plug on the non candy end of the introduction cage.. "

    link to the thread and pix here tom:
    a queen

    "after reading more here, it sounds like I should combine all my bees into one or two at most deeps...does this sound about right? Tom "

    i will ask too like perry did, and sorry if i missed your post about hive configuration....?

    i am a bee hoarder tom, so if i think i have enough bees even for 2 small nucs with good laying queens, i would shoot for that, especially if you have 2 queens on the way. btw, what race are the queens you ordered?
     
  8. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Brooksbeefarm said:
    "For the past ten years now, i have been making queen introduction frames. Hope i can explain this right? I cut a 4 in. gap out of the top bar (in the middle), i then make a top bar that will fit under the top bar and between the inside of the end bars.I nail the two top bars together, this makes a gap where you can lay the queen cage flat with the screen up on the top bar and room on the end of the queen cage for the workers to eat the candy out of the end to release the queen.You can place this frame under the hole in the inner cover so when you lift the lid off you can see if the queen has been released or not without disturbing the hive to much.:thumbsup: I use migratory lids, so i get a full view.You do have to cut the bottom off a sheet of foundation to make it fit in this frame, but once it is drawn out you can use it over and over. I need to learn how to send pictures.:roll: Jack"

    jb63 said:
    "[​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG] Jack,thanks for the description of your introduction frame .I made one and loaned it to a gal who bought a queen "


    PerryBee says: This is what happens when you join the right forum! :wink: :mrgreen:
     
  9. tmrschessie

    tmrschessie New Member

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    I am using 10 frame deep boxes for the the bees, One group is in 3 of them, polled one off them yesterday. The second group has 2 deep 10 frames, they are both bringing in honey now and they are still testy .... Think I will make a frame to put the queen box in like in the pictures. Thanks again all for the input. Will watch the queens closely to see how they do. They are Iowa Queens, raised by a bee keeper in Iowa. He said they are really gentle bees so hopefully I can get them calmed down a bit. Thank You all again for the help. Tom
     
  10. tmrschessie

    tmrschessie New Member

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    bee job in Fairfield Sharon P 001.jpg I know it is rough but do you think this will work? I used an old medium super frame I had laying around and a piece of scrap wood. Tom
     
  11. Dunkel

    Dunkel New Member

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    Hey, I really like that frame idea. I have been making up about 10 nucs with mated queens in the spring. I have been using the d.coates style nucs. They work good but are not exactly described as being spacious, especially with pulled comb. They would be great to pull the lid check and do manipulations without digging deep. That would also be handy to do a quick release by pulling the cork and shutting the lid.
     
  12. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    tom, the bees don't care.......:grin:
    btw great post perry, and post of jack's description and pictures!

    tom, what race of queens are you getting? and from what beek in iowa, i am familiar with alot of beeks there.

    tom, when you set the queens in, maybe just before you put her on that frame and set it in, just lay her on top the frames, stand back and watch what happens for a few minutes. this helps the learning process of introducing queens. watch the bees and their behavior. if the bees are 'anxious' for a queen and accepting, they will attend to her as tecumseh said. they will stick their antenna and tongues in to touch her, this would be a good sign, and if bees around here start fanning, they are sending her pheromone throughout the hive. watch and enjoy. introducing a queen they are willing to accept will excite, but calm the hive, and their behavior is fun to watch.

    if however, the bees try to stick their butts in the cage, or 'ball' it, acceptance of the queen may be questionable, and an indirect release upon observing this behavior is best.

    i practice indirect release of queens anyway, and don't have the fancy or rough frame as you and perry posted, but it is a great way to check the hive to see that she has been released with little disruption to the hive.

    you will do just fine! :grin:
     
  13. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Looks good to me. :thumbsup:
     
  14. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip..
    they are both bringing in honey now and they are still testy

    tecumseh...
    testy huh? as I sometimes suggest a hive's disposition is often a good indication if you do have a queen in the box.

    if it has been a while with no queen in the box often times I throughly go thru a hive and look 1) for queen cells or anything suggesting a queen cell has been recently used and 2) polishing of round area of comb generally at the center of the primary brood nest <generally speaking there will be no adult bees walking on these newly polished surfaces (comb).

    #2 is often times accomplished a day or so ahead of a new queen beginning to lay and it appears almost like 'the girls' have placed down a sign on the area informing everyone that the floors are newly cleaned and polished.

    .
     
  15. tmrschessie

    tmrschessie New Member

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    Thanks guys for the input will definitely watch and see the reaction to here before closing them up. I realize it is not as neatly done as yours PerryBee...but just getting back into this after several years away ...lol just making do with the left overs for now. Will definitely have a better set up in the future. Tom

     
  16. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Hi Tom:
    Those are not mine, I just found the posts ( Jack's and jb63's) and linked 'em for ya.
    While I would like to take credit for it, I'm just not that smart. :wink: :lol:
     
  17. tmrschessie

    tmrschessie New Member

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    Got my queens today

    Got my two queens in this morning, both were in great shape, I gave them each a drop of water which they went for.....I then suited up and went to the bees ....they came in a plastic queen cage. not the three hole type. So I took the advice of riverbee and set them on top of the frames...the bees almost immediately began trying to feed the queen in each box. What a relief... I then pointed the queen cage slightly downward and rubber banded it in place. I nicked the candy to let the nurse bees get the idea...which they did...Will leave them be for four days and check on them...Could not get pictures due to the aggressive bees....had my gloves on...but I did notice the tone go from a roar to a hummm except for the guard bees...lol Thank you all again for the moral and personal help. Tom

    P.S. Got the queens "Iowa Queens" marked for $18 each plus $10 shipping, from Ebert Honey Co, LLC adam.ebert@eberthoney.com

    He has several varieties of queens but I wanted these as they are very calm. Let him know you got the information here.
     
  18. tmrschessie

    tmrschessie New Member

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    Well, an update....one queen killed, the other queen left the hive with all the bees.....The hive that killed the queen appears to be doing ok. They are the meanest ones though. I am going to let them bee for a a few weeks, except for water and feeding if needed. They are in two deep boxes. The top box is about 3/4 fur of bees and honey. The bottom box has about 3 frames being worked over by the bees with just a touch of honey to this point. The workers are polishing up the comb in the bottom box. I did not get into them much to see if there was any brood as they have seemed to have expanded since I placed them in the boxes....at any point of the three groups, to are in the woods now and one is still in place. Tom