Northern pests and diseases?

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by darrenct83, Jun 26, 2011.

  1. darrenct83

    darrenct83 New Member

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    Most of the pests and diseases for bees I read about seem to be for you folks down south. I am only a couple hours away from Canada. What kind of pests and diseases do I need to worry about in my neck of the woods?
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    American foul brood
    European foul brood
    chalk brood
    nosema
    wax moth
    varroa nites
    tracheal mite
    small hive beetle


    that should just about cover it, you may not have much troubles with small hive beetle yet, and wax moth will be short lived since you have much more colder weather, but the rest can be a threat to the bees.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    as G3 seems to suggest us southern bee keepers don't have no monopoly on any of the disease or pest of honey bees. certainly wax moth and the shb are more of a problem for southern bee keepers simply because all insects active season is longer here. I suspect some pest like tracheal mites may be more of a serious concern for northern bee keepers than for southern bee keepers.
     
  4. darrenct83

    darrenct83 New Member

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    Thanks guys. I've been hearing a lot of chatter about SHB since I have been on here, but it seems that most of the people talking about any diseases as of lately are from the south. I'm sure it simply has to do with the bug seasons as suggested. I didn't expect to find out my bees are bug proof. I'm just curious what I am up against. So far the hive seems healthy. I will probably start testing for mites soon. I'm still working on getting the hang of the whole business.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    sounds like you are headed down the proper path trying to get some feel for varroa. I suspect shb is a large topic (for us southern bee keepers) simply because it is the newest problem on the block and many of us are feelin' our way (the blind leading the blind) towards some solution.

    beyond varroa learn the differences between the two brood diseases (one typically occurs in the uncapped and the other in the capped stages of the larval bees life). those two are the easy ones... the nosema twins may be a bit more difficult to recognize. there may also be some serious correlation of one disease to another which typically means without some intervention the hive will perish.

    it is also good to consider what action you will employ when you do encounter these problems.
     
  6. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    "It is also good to consider what action you will employ when you do encounter these problems"

    I am so glad to see this point being made. I have just started selling a few nucs and I am trying to impress on the folks buying them that they will have to have some plan for dealing with varroa! I hope my point is being well taken because nobody is immune to having to deal with it. Nobody I have heard of is selling varroa free bees and to think that you can avoid the problem is being willfully blind.
     
  7. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

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    Generally speaking tracheal mites are of no concern. I have heard of no cases in a long time. They seem to have come and gone. Or maybe varroa just overshadow their presence.

    SHB in northern climes are not much of a concern and I certainly wouldn't treat the hive for them. Especially for a small scale beekeeper.

    Varroa will be your major pest and concern. Varroa will have the most impact on your beekeeping methodologies. Varroa have killed more colonies than AFB ever has. The difference is that once the colony is dead from Varroa, being a pest, one can reoccupy the equipment.

    Whereas AFB, being a Disease, and one that can't be cleaned from the equipment, demands radical attention, meaning the destroying of the colony and burning of the combs. Unless one uses an antibiotic preventitive, which I don't recommends.

    I inspected colonies for the State of NY and never saw a case of EFB. I probably wouldn't recognize it if I saw it now. I'd probably misdiagnose it as AFB. You could check w/ your State Apiculturalist to find out if EFB is even on their radar. Something they inspect for. If not, don't concern yourself too much. Learning about it is a good idea tho.

    Wax moth, in someways similar to SHB, are opportunistic pests of the equipment. The best defence against them, at least in the north, is strong colonies. Also storing equipment not in use to prevent distruction by wax moths is important. But you shouldn't have much of that starting out.

    That's my input for now. Enjoy. Don't be overwhelmed.
     
  8. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    The University of Minnesota offers an online course on "healthy bees":

    http://www.extension.umn.edu/honeybees/components/healthybeesonline.htm

    The format is easy to use. I think they went out of their way to make it not overwhelming. The cost is $25 and, I think the fee gives you access to the course for 4 years (just in case you want to brush up on diagnosis and treatment).

    I found it helpful.

    Walt
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    sqkcrk writes:
    Whereas AFB, being a Disease, and one that can't be cleaned from the equipment, demands radical attention, meaning the destroying of the colony and burning of the combs. Unless one uses an antibiotic preventitive, which I don't recommends.

    I inspected colonies for the State of NY and never saw a case of EFB. I probably wouldn't recognize it if I saw it now. I'd probably misdiagnose it as AFB. You could check w/ your State Apiculturalist to find out if EFB is even on their radar. Something they inspect for. If not, don't concern yourself too much. Learning about it is a good idea tho.

    tecumseh:
    if you are one of them socialist bee keeper from North Carolina you may also treat AFB with radiation... from what I can tell this kills almost everything.

    some folks think EFB is as much about nutrition as anything else. a good honey flow will often clear this problem up pretty quickly.
     
  10. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I agree about the EFB along with some good weather, seems hot and dry weather helps rid themselves of it.