Nosema Ceranae

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by ski, Jan 24, 2009.

  1. ski

    ski New Member

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    Is anybody treating for Nosema ceranae or was it just a scare to sell more drugs?
     
  2. dogsoldier13

    dogsoldier13 New Member

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    as i understand it,you treat for nosema in the spring once only with fumigillin,mix with sugar syrup according to directions
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Nosema Apis is the one we have always had and the one we have always treated for.

    Nosema Ceranae is a new problem just found in the last few years. Does anyone here know if Fumagillin will kill it, too. I am not familiar with the treatment for N. Ceranae.
     
  4. ski

    ski New Member

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    I had a big time bee keeper in Ga tell me last fall that fumagillin is the cure in the spring and the fall. But I have not heard anything since then. The Jan issue of Be Culture talks about using a 10% bleach solution.(90% water 10%bleach) to kill 100% of the spores. But they have not tested the effects on combs or equipment.
     
  5. dogsoldier13

    dogsoldier13 New Member

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    the use of bleach doesnt sound like a good idea
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I use it to disinfect all my extracting equipment, canning jars, ETC. Chlorine evaporates rapidly. I think if you let it air for 24 or more hours before using, it would not affect the bees at all.

    I wouldn't use it in a live hive, as the fumes alone are deadly.
     
  7. Bcrazy

    Bcrazy New Member

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    Here in the UK we have recently accepted that Nosema ceranea has been with us for a few years, but because we just considered the problem was caused by the microspoidian N. apis it never occured to scientistis to double check. So when we check for Nosema it is considered that it could bee N.ceranae.

    Infection is aggrevated by transporting colonies to new sites where there may be desirable nectar-flow or where pollination is required

    Fumidil B is an antibiotic and this is what is reccomended as treatment but why treat with a chemical when it does NOT KILL the spores. Comb change Baily frame change etc helps prevent the spread but if one bee has the spores in the ventriculus (stomach) then defecates in the hive the cycle will start all over again.

    That's beekeeping.

    Regards;
    .